RCScrapyard ► Iconic Vintage Radio Controlled (RC) Model Car Archive ► Tamiya F103 Chassis.
Tamiya Buggys RCScrapyard: New, used, second hand radio controlled models, parts and spares.
Established 1999
Tamiya Monster Buggy
Search Site Search
Radio Controlled Models    Flags    From Around The WORLD

Tamiya F103 Chassis

1/10 Scale Electric Formula One Car Chassis:

  A number of changes were made to the F103 following the old F102 chassis. The chassis plate, motor mount and upper deck were re-designed, a friction damper coupled with a damper plate assemble was included and the steering servo was re-positioned.
  In the old F102 the steering servo was laid on its side, this meant the tie rods were different lengths, giving the car a different turning circle on the left to that right. In the F103 the servo is held upright in a fixed frame, allowing the rods to be of even length. My first thoughts when I saw this was it raised the centre of gravity. However, my first run of the F103 was a revelation. The car handled like a dream, I was amazed at the difference a small change like that could make.
  Like the majority of Tamiya budget Radio Controlled Models, the kit comes with plastic and sintered brass bush type bearings that after a short while, when dust and grit get into them, actually wear into the metal shafts - if you are building this kit to race seriously, these should be discarded and replaced by a full set of steel shielded ball bearings.
  In conclusion. The F103 chassis is a vast improvement over its predecessors and in the right hands can be a world beater.
      Rating: 3.53.5 Stars out of 5 Reviewed by: RCScrapyard     Manual.





★ Tamiya F103 Chassis ★
Tamiya F103 Chassis














USA

Tamiya F103: For Sale in the USA





Flags


Tamiya F103 Chassis
Tamiya F103 Chassis
Tamiya F103 Chassis - Front and Rear
Tamiya F103 Chassis Front and Rear

Hints and Tips

Tires for RC Models

Sponge (Foam) Tires:

   Sponge Tires can be purchased either pre mounted, glued and trued on the rims, or separately. Fitting the Tires onto the rims can be messy, so here are a few tips to make it a bit easier.
   If you are fitting new Tires on old rims, make sure the old sponge Tire is completely removed. To do this, I recommend using a wood lathe and apiece of wood, at least 300mm long, and more than the width of your wheels, with medium grit emery paper stuck to it ... sand paper will also work, but emery is harder wearing ... This will also be used for truing a wheel. (Described later)

How to Mount and Glue Sponge Tires onto Wheels/Rims.

1/   Mount the Tires on the rims. Make sure they are reasonably tight on the rims, too loose and you might have problems.

2/   I find this to be easier if either in the lathe, or on the car itself. (but be careful with that glue)
  Using your thumb and forefinger, lift up the Tire off the rim, then using a small spatula or a thin piece of rigid wood or plastic dipped in glue (I recommend Evo-Stik, Impact Adhesive) slip it in the gap, making sure both the Tire and the rim are smeared. Then lower the Tire back onto the rim and press it down. Turn the Tire approximately 60 degrees and repeat.

3/   Depending on the width of the Tire you may need to repeat the process on the inside also.


How to True Sponge Tires.

   Truing Sponge Tires is essential if you are serious about racing competitively. To do this you will need the piece of wood, as described earlier and a good pair of vernier or digital calipers.
   Sponge Tires will always wear unevenly, weather you race on Carpet or Tarmac. The outside wheels will always end a race smaller than the ones on the inside, so after each race I recommend swapping them over (unless you are fortunate to have a new set for each race) and dont forget to adjust the steering trim on your transmitter before the next race.

1/   Before starting, check each mounted Tire for diameter and order them smallest to largest. Start with the smallest and mount it in the lathe.

2/   Make sure you are wearing safety glasses before you start this procedure: Lay the sanding wood under the Tire so that it can be pivoted up from behind onto the Tire. Start the lathe spinning, so that as you stand infront of the Tire, it is rotating downwards. Slowly lift the sanding wood and try to hold it ridged as it comes up against the Tire. There will be a high point on the Tire that if you hold the bat rigid enough will eventually wear down until the Tire appears completely concentric. at this point stop the lathe and measure the diameter on the inside and outside of the width. If needs be, repeat the process until satisfied.
Repeat for each Tire, matching them in pairs for diameter.
If considered necessary also trim the sides.


For More Setup Information check out my Hints and Tips page.



^ TOP ^


    ★ RC Information and Advice ★    









★ Tamiya Radio Controlled Model Accessories: ★
540 Electric Motors
Tamiya Motors
Battery Packs
Bats + Chargers
Bearings and Bearing Sets
Tamiya Bearings
Body Shells
Tamiya Shells
Electronic Speed Controllers
Tamiya ESC
Radio Equipment
Tamiy Radio
Dampers
Tamiya Shocks
Tires
Tamiya Tires
Wheels / Rims
Tamiya Wheels


★ Tamiya F103RS Chassis ★
Tamiya F103 Chassis


Hints and Tips


How to Charge Rechargeable Batteries
for Radio Controlled Models

Ni-Cad (Nickel Cadmium) Batteries


1/  All Ni-Cad Batteries have to be Discharged soon after use. This is to avoid the dreaded "Memory" effect that on subsequent re-charges can cause a momentary drop in performance during a race. A simple discharger can be made from a car 12v bulb.

2/  Try to time your charge to complete just before a race. This will ensure maximum punch and duration. If a Ni-Cad is left to cool after a charge this advantage dissipates.

3/  The higher the charge current the more Punch the Ni-Cad battery will have (up to around 8 amps), however, the downside to this is a reduction in duration and effective battery life.

4/  Ni-Cad Batteries should be left to cool for about an hour after use before recharging. This will increase the effective life of the battery.


Ni-Mh (Nickel Metal Hydride) Batteries


1/  Never charge Ni-Mh batteries at a current higher than 4.5 amps. Although these batteries can give a higher voltage than Ni-Cad Batteries, they are much more sensitive and easy to damage if charged too quickly.

2/  Charging methods for Ni-Mh batteries can also be detrimental. The best I found was the "Slope" method. Avoid "Pulse" charging as this tends to effect crystal formation detrimentally and (it seems to kill them off) thus reduces duration over time.

3/  If using a temperature cut off charger on Ni-Mh batteries set to no more than 40 Degrees Centigrade. Any higher than this can damage the crystals.

4/  It is not necessary to discharge Ni-Mh Batteries. Unlike Ni-Cad batteries they do not develop a memory. Also, if they are totally discharged they sometimes will not charge straight after and need to be coaxed with a 10 minute trickle charge.

5/  Ni Mh Batteries can be recharged shortly after use without any discernable detrimental effects.


Li-Po (Lithium-Polymer) Batteries


1/  Li-Po batteries are a huge step forward in performance compared with Ni-Cad and Ni-Mh batteries. However, care has to be taken when charging. If certain procedures are not followed they could burst into flames or even explode, therefore I do not recommend Li-Po batteries for RC beginners.

2/  Li-Po batteries are more expensive and have a shorter effective life. Generally considered to be between 200 to 400 charge cycles compared to 1000+ for Ni-Cad and Ni-Mh.

3/  Consider a Battery pack listed as "2S 5000Mah 40c 2C".
"2S" is the number of cells in the pack, in this case 2 cells. Each cell provides around 3.7 Volts, so a 2S pack is around 7.4 Volts.
"5000Mah" (Mili-Amp-Hours) is the capacity. The amount of charge the pack can hold.
"40c" is the maximum Discharge rate. Which in our example would be calculated as 5000 (Mah) x 40 = 200000Ma (200 Amps).
"2C" is the maximum Charge rate. 1C being 5 Amps, so in our example 2 x 5 = 10 Amps.

4/  To safely charge your Li-Po Battery I would recommend a good Computerised charger, preferably one that can handle a Charge current of around 25A and always place the charging battery on a fireproof surface.

5/  Finally. NEVER leave your charging Li-Po battery unattended and NEVER EVER charge it above the recommended rate. When not in use, store with around 60% charge remaining in a fireproof box.


For More Setup Information check out my Hints and Tips page.



On/Off Road
RC Models:

Other RC Models:

Radio Equipment:

Accessories:
Buggys

Formula One

Monster Trucks

Rock Crawlers

Touring/WRC/Drift Cars

Trucks/Truggys



Airplanes

Boats/Ships

Helicopters

Motorcycles

Submarines

Tanks



Crystal Sets

Receivers

Servos

Transmitters



Batteries

Battery Chargers

Bearings

Body Shells

Dampers (Shocks)

Electric Motors



ESC

Nitro Engines

Pinion Gears

Spur Gears

Tires

Wheels