RCScrapyard ► Iconic Vintage Radio Controlled (RC) Model Car Archive ► Tamiya Alfa-Romeo-MiTo. ITEM (#58453 M-05)(#57065 M-05)
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Tamiya Alfa Romeo MiTo - #58453 (Radio Controlled Model Review)

1/10 Scale Electric M-Chassis Model Car - M-05 Chassis:

  Released by Tamiya on April 21, 2010, the Alfa Romeo MiTo was the forth Radio Controlled model to be based on the short wheelbase M05 Chassis.

Tamiya Alfa-Romeo-MiTo - #58453 M-05
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  The 2WD, FWD (front wheel drive) M05 Chassis has a lower centre of gravity than previous versions and good weight distribution which coupled with four wheel independent double wishbone suspension with coil spring over friction shock absorbers, orbital bevel gear differential and a three piece steering linkage gives excellent stability and handling on high speed corners.

  The M05 Chassis has three possible wheelbase options: The basic 210mm, M05M 225mm and M05L 239mm, that are set by changing the position of the rear suspension parts.

  Like the majority of the Tamiya budget priced Radio Controlled models, the standard kit comes with plastic and sintered brass bush type bearings, that after a short while, when dust and grit get into them, actually wear into the metal drive shafts that spin in them. If you are building this kit to race seriously these should be replaced by steel shielded ball bearings.

  To drive, the M05 Chassis has much improved balance and the low centre of gravity provides excellent stability in comparison to the first FWD short wheelbase Tamiya models, the M01 and M03. However, it still needs some skill to keep it on its wheels and just like its predecessors, provides lots of fun.


      Rating: 44 Stars out of 5 Reviewed by: RCScrapyard     Manual.

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Tamiya Alfa Romeo MiTo #58453 M-05 - Chassis
Tamiya Alfa Romeo MiTo #58453 M-05 Chassis
Tamiya Alfa Romeo MiTo #58453 M-05 - Chassis
Tamiya M-05 Chassis

Buying a Used Tamiya Alfa Romeo MiTo
Touring Car (and What to look for)


   Buying a used Tamiya Alfa Romeo MiTo Electric Touring Car, or any used RC Model, has a number of advantages. It is generally cheaper than new, ready built and may come with a variety of expensive hop-ups already installed. Cheap, pre-loved bargains are always becoming available. However, depending on the age of your purchase, it may need a little tender loving care before you can take it out on the back yard.

   The one thing you will always need is an instruction manual. If not supplied with your purchase, they can often be downloaded from the Tamiya website, or purchased separately on eBay. With an instruction manual, any problems with your model Touring Car you may discover, can easily be fixed.

Dampers
   When you receive your used Tamiya Touring Car, make a general visual inspection of the chassis, front and rear wishbones, suspension shock towers etc, for any broken parts that may need to be replaced. Then, take a screwdriver and box spanner and check each self tapping screw and nut for security, taking care not to over tighten.

   Next, for those Tamiya models with oil filled shock absorbers, remove them from the chassis and dismantle the coil springs. The damper shafts should push in and pull out with a smooth action. If you feel a jolt as you change direction, this means the oil has leaked out and must be topped up. At the same time, change the O-Ring seals to prevent more leakage. Also check the damper shafts for damage. If they are scratched, change them as soon as possible.

   If the body shell of your Tamiya Alfa Romeo MiTo is broken, ripped or damaged in any way, this can be easily repaired with rubber solution glue. Also, for added protection and if available for your Alfa Romeo MiTo model, fit an under guard to stop dirt and gravel entering the chassis.

Titanium Turnbuckles
   Examine the drive shafts for wear and replace as required. If possible, change them for titanium. The steel shafts wear and bend too easily.

   If you intend to race your Alfa Romeo MiTo Touring Car model at a competitive level, I would also recommend you obtain and fit titanium pivot shafts, turnbuckles, tie rods and steering rods.

   On Belt driven models, the Drive Belts need checking at regular intervals for wear, tension and damage. If deemed necessary, adjust the tensioning pulley until the belt can be depressed in the centre by no more than around 5mm. If the belt was slack, also examine the drive pulleys for wear. The teeth should provide a well seated fit for the belt teeth and not be rounded on the corners. If the belt teeth do not fit snugly, change the pulleys as soon as possible. For top level racing it may be prudent to replace all belts and pulleys after each race meeting.

   For Gear driven models, the gearbox of your used Touring Car should be opened up to check for gear wear and lubrication. A thin coat of grease is often used on internal gears and although this is fine for basic running around on the back yard, if you intend to race your Touring Car at a higher level, this should be removed and replaced with racing oil (ZX1 or Teflon Oil). Of course, this should be reapplied after each race meeting.

Spur Gears
   Gears are a weakness on all Touring Car RC models. Head on collisions can easily damage the gear teeth on nylon and plastic spur gears. Heavy impacts can also loosen the nuts or self tapping screws that hold the Electric Motor in Position, allowing the pinion gear to pull out of mesh slightly and rip the tops off the teeth on your spur gear. To minimise this possibility, fit bolts with locking nuts to the Electric Motor mount and remember to check them for security after every two or three runs.

   Ball joints always cause problems. For top level Electric Touring Car racing, the plastic ball connectors should be checked and if deemed necessary, changed after every meeting. A simple thing like a loose fitting connector popping off, could easily end your race, so better safe than sorry.

Servo Gears
   The Alfa Romeo MiTo steering servo is also prone to damage. In high speed crash situations, the fragile gear teeth of the servo can be broken off, rendering your expensive servo useless, so be sure to obtain a good quality "Servo Saver". Check out my Servo Information article.

   If body roll on your Tamiya Alfa Romeo MiTo is a problem, handling can be improved with the use of stabilizers, anti roll or sway bars, stiffer tuning springs and, or, thicker silicone oil in the dampers.

Ball Bearings
   If your used Tamiya Touring Car comes with plastic and sintered brass bushings (ring type bearings), check the shafts that run in them for wear. Dust and grit can get into these bearings and abrade the shafts. Therefore, you should replace them all with shielded ball bearings. If the model has been run with ring type bearings, you may have to change all the axles and driveshafts. For more information, take a look at my article, How to get the best from your Bearings.

   Finally, good luck with your Alfa Romeo MiTo model and good racing.


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Hints and Tips


Bearings

   If you are serious about your racing, looking after your bearings is essential if you are to remain competitive.
   My own experience is in both Off and On Road, National and International Car racing, but most of these tips could be useful to all forms of RC.

   Shields: The main problem with Ball Bearing Shields is they create friction and obviously the more you can reduce friction, the more efficient your bearings will be, so here's a tip that does just that.
   Wheel Bearings always come in pairs, positioned side by side. If you think about it, the two inside shields on each bearing are not required, so ... you can remove them using a small jewelers screwdriver ... simple. And in one fell swoop you have halved your wheel bearing friction.

   Cleaning: All Bearings need to be cleaned from time to time. Depending on how focused and competitive you are, this can be as often as after each race meeting, or just once or twice a year ... For Club Meetings once or twice a year might be all you need if you are easily beating your competition, but for the BIG meets you need that extra 5% or 10% just to be up with the rest.
What you need is a small glass jar, a jewelers screwdriver, an old tooth brush and some Isopropanol.
Remove the shields, then drop the bearings in the jar, add some Isopropanol, pop on the lid and shake well. Empty them out, give them a good brushing and make sure they spin free then repeat the process. Clean the shields separately. Once you are satisfied, lay them on a piece of kitchen roll and allow to dry.

   Lubrication: The arguments I have had about what lubrication to use you wouldn't believe. Some of the top racers of my day swore they didn't use any at all, but cleaned out the original lubrication and ran them dry ... they also admitted to fitting a new set after each meeting ... well, they were getting them for free.
My tip is, yes even with a new set of bearings, clean out the original lubrication (as described above) and with one shield in place use the thinnest oil you can find ... I recommend ZX1 (Zed Ex One) or sewing machine oil.

For More Setup Information check out my Hints and Tips page.

Gear Differentials


   The Gear Differentials, commonly used in Tamiya Buggys, Trucks, Touring Cars, Monster Trucks and some of the early Tamiya Formula One and Le-Mans cars, are by design more robust than the high maintenance Ball Differentials.

   The configuration uses a main drive gear, fixed on each side of the drive axles and either three or four small metal orbital bevel gears, in a plastic gear housing, providing the drive to each side of the car when cornering, to allow the inside wheel to rotate slower than the outside wheel.

   Maintaining your Gear differentials is crucial if your car is to be competitive. Regular greasing is required, preferably molybdenum grease with graphite flakes, smeared over the gear teeth. If neglected, the gear teeth grind and wear at a rapid rate and will quickly fail, leaving you with a potentially expensive rebuild.

   For slower moving models such as Monster Trucks, Rock Crawlers and budget end Off road Buggys, Trucks and On Road Drift and Touring Cars, where low friction differential action is not essential, Gear Differentials are ideal, providing drive to each wheel as required. However, for top level competitive racing ,On and Off Road, Ball Differentials are preferable. Admittedly, they require a little more maintenance, but the benefits on the track far outweigh the negatives of the old Gear diffs.

For More Setup Information check out my Hints and Tips page.









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