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Tamiya FW Sports Special - #92001 (Radio Controlled Model Review)

1/10 Scale Electric Formula One - (RW1/RW2) Chassis:

  Released by Tamiya on November 10, 1987, the Road Wizard Footworks Sports Special Complete Package (#92001) was a Limited Edition, complete with Futaba Attack FP-2NBL radio system, MC112B ESC, two bodyshells and 3 sets of decals.

Tamiya FW Sports Special - #92001
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  The Road Wizard is based on an FRP plate chassis with the "T-Bar" cut into the chassis to allow rear flexure and came with a gear type differential, coil spring over oil filled damper and bushings.

  The model comes with Plastic bush type bearings, that after a short while, when dust and grit get into them, can actually wear into the metal drive shafts that spin in them - our recommendation is that these should be replaced by a full set of steel shielded ball bearings ASAP.


      Rating: 3.53.5 Stars out of 5 Reviewed by: RCScrapyard     Manual.

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Tamiya FW Sports Special - Road Wizard F-1
Tamiya FW Sports Special

Tamiya FW Sports Special
Tamiya FW Sports Special

Tamiya Road Wizard F-1 - Chassis
Tamiya Road Wizard F-1 Chassis

Tamiya Road Wizard F-1 - Chassis
Tamiya Road Wizard F-1 Chassis


General Information and Advice

   For those starting in Radio Controlled Racing, here are a few Hints and Tips: Firstly, buy a Kit not an RTR. That way, if something breaks you will have some idea how to fix it.

   Radio Controlled Model Cars are very fragile and easily broken. The main parts to protect are the Front Wishbones, Suspension Shock Towers, Dampers, Hub Carriers, Kingpins, Uprights and Toe in Blocks, so make sure you have a good strong front bumper and Lexan or Hard Plastic Body Shell and if available for your model, a protective under tray, to prevent grit and dust getting into any moving parts.

   The Steering Servo is also a weakness in high speed crash situations, so get yourself some good strong Servo Mount and Servo Saver. Also I would recommend Titanium Shafts, Turnbuckles, Tie Rods and pivot/steering shafts and if available for your model, lightweight Titanium Drive shafts, dog bones and CVD (Constant Velocity Drives). The standard steel types are far too easily bent.

   Gearing is another problem area on RC model cars. Head on collisions can easily break off gear teeth on Nylon/Plastic Spur Gears and even Bevel Gears inside the Gearbox. Heavy impacts can also loosen nuts and self taping screws that hold the Motor in Position, allowing the Pinion Gear to pull out of mesh slightly and rip the tops of the teeth on your Spur Gear. To avoid this to some degree, fit locking nuts and a new motor mount from time to time, so the self taping screws that hold the motor in position have less chance to come loose.

   Ball joints always cause problems. For top level Radio Controlled model car racing, the plastic ball connectors should be checked and if deemed necessary changed after every meeting. A simple thing like a loose fitting connector breaking free could easily end your race, so better safe than sorry.

   Many New car kits come with Nylon and Sintered Brass Ring type bearings. My advice is to discard these before initial installation and buy a good Hop-up set of Shielded Steel Ball Bearings. Or if you are serious about your racing, Teflon or Ceramic Bearings.

   One final piece of advice about the Setup of your Car. Keep the Centre of Gravity as low as possible. Ride Height is all important. For On Road Drift/Touring cars the Ride Height should be no more than 5mm, for Buggys, Trucks, Truggys and Monster Trucks, as low as possible depending on the track conditions. If Body Roll is a problem, handling can be improved with the use of Stabilizers, Anti roll or Sway Bars, stiffer Tuning Springs and, or thicker Silicon Oil in the Dampers. Also find somewhere to mount the Transponder as low in the Chassis as possible.

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Or, check out our RC Model Car Setup Guide













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Hints and Tips

Your First Race Meeting

   When you finally find a racing club near to where you live, that initial experience of stepping up onto the rostrum and looking down over the track can be very daunting. But soon, as the race starts, adrenaline will kick in and away you go. For the next five minutes, your focus is on nothing but getting your car around each corner, avoiding all the other cars on the track and just getting to the end of the race.

   Maybe your batteries dumped or you crashed and the car was damaged, perhaps you didn't actually come last, whatever happened, it doesn't really matter you are well and truly hooked.

   When the race is over, don't be afraid to ask the more experienced racers questions about setup, driving tips etc. They have all been where you are now and will be more than willing to help you. Show them your car, get some tips on tires, gearing and general set-up for the club track.

   Then, when you get back home, go through all your races in your mind. Try to identify the things you did wrong and figure out how to avoid those mistakes next time. Think about what all the more experienced racers told you and change your settings as they advised.

   Put down a few buckets or cones in the back yard to practice driving round, something that if you hit it won't damage your car. Get someone to time you for say ten laps and each day after school, try to beat that time. The adage, "Practice makes perfect" holds true in many things, not least the sport of RC racing and as your confidence increases, your racing skills improve and the trophies begin to line up on your bedroom shelf, you will one day yourself be the guy all the newbie's look to for advice and you will remember that day, you nervously stepped up onto that platform for the first time, looked down across the track and how your whole life changed in that fleeting moment.

For More Setup Information check out my Hints and Tips page.








Hints and Tips

Radio Frequencies

   After buying your first car, it won't be long before you need more than simply bashing around the back yard, or out on the street. So you will be looking around to find a club that is not too far away where you can do some serious racing.

   Before you can start racing, you will need at least three different sets of crystal frequencies. The race organisers will note down all your available frequencies when you register at the track and allocate one of those frequencies to you for your heat. To avoid change over problems from one heat to the next, they generally try to give you a frequency that no one in the heat before or after is using, but always check to make sure before you put your car down on the track and switch on.

   There is nothing more annoying than to be in the middle of your best qualifying race and some idiot switching on their transmitter in the pits, on your frequency. Not only could it spoil your race, but it could cost you a lot of money if at the time you are travelling at top speed along the straight, loose control and crash head on into the wall. Just imagine how you would feel.

   Now, imagine this scenario. You are at your RC meeting and you need to run your car to check out some changes you have made, either after a crash repair, to adjust the steering servo, or just fine tune your car before the next race. What do you do?

   Before you switch on anything, the first thing to do is check with race control, to make sure that none of the racers presently on the track or in the next heat are on the same frequency you want to use. The people in charge are always willing to help in these situations and if none of your three available frequencies are safe for you to use, they will often lend you some crystals, sometimes for a small fee.

   Some of the bigger meetings use a board displaying all the possible frequencies, indicating which of those frequencies are in use at that time and which are available for others to use. To claim a particular frequency you simply take a peg or marker off the board so that others wanting to check their car out can not use the same frequency as you. Before the next heat, this board is updated and any missing pegs must be accounted for. So obviously the best time to claim your frequency, is at the start of a heat and you must return it before the start of the next heat.

   So, be cautious, use the protocols at your track as they should be used and you won't make any enemies you know it makes sense.

For More Setup Information check out my Hints and Tips page.








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