RCScrapyard ► Iconic Vintage Radio Controlled (RC) Model Car Archive ► Tamiya Williams F1 BMW FW24. ITEM #58303 F201
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Tamiya Williams F1 BMW FW24 - #58303 (Radio Controlled Model)

1/10 Scale Electric Formula One Car - F201 Chassis:

  Released by Tamiya on February 26, 2003, this self assembly Radio Controlled Formula One model, based on the 4WD F201 Chassis is of the Williams F1 BMW FW24 that was driven by Juan Pablo Montoya and Ralf Schumacher in the 2002 F1 Championship, finishing overall Second and Third respectively.

Tamiya Williams F1 Team BMW FW24

  The ABS resin chassis for the F201 employs front and rear ball differentials that transmit drive from the centrally positioned spur gear assembly through two prop shafts to the front and rear wheels.

  The suspension, similar to that first used on the Tenth Technology Predator in the early 1990s, employs four horizontally mounted coil spring over oil filled shock absorbers. This, coupled with the transversely mounted battery, positioned centrally, in front of the motor, provided almost perfect balance to the car. A full set of steel shielded ball bearings also come with the kit.

  With the F201 chassis, Tamiya have produced the ultimate Radio Controlled Formula One experience. To drive, the F201 is superb to say the least. Just point it into the corner at the right angle and accelerate out with ease brilliant.

  Unfortunately for me, at my local racing club, the F201 chassis was banned when it first came out, so I had to fall back on my old faithful F103.


      Rating: 4.54.5 Stars out of 5 Reviewed by: RCScrapyard     Manual.





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Tamiya Williams F1 BMW FW24 #58303 F201 - Chassis
Tamiya Williams F1 BMW FW24 #58303 F201 Chassis
Tamiya Williams F1 BMW FW24 #58303 F201
Tamiya Williams F1 BMW FW24 #58303 F201 Body Shell

General Information and Advice

   For those starting in Radio Controlled Racing, here are a few Hints and Tips: Firstly, buy a Kit not an RTR. That way, if something breaks you will have some idea how to fix it.

   Radio Controlled Model Cars are very fragile and easily broken. The main parts to protect are the Front Wishbones, Suspension Shock Towers, Dampers, Hub Carriers, Kingpins, Uprights and Toe in Blocks, so make sure you have a good strong front bumper and Lexan or Hard Plastic Body Shell and if available for your model, a protective under tray, to prevent grit and dust getting into any moving parts.

   The Steering Servo is also a weakness in high speed crash situations, so get yourself some good strong Servo Mount and Servo Saver. Also I would recommend Titanium Shafts, Turnbuckles, Tie Rods and pivot/steering shafts and if available for your model, lightweight Titanium Drive shafts, dog bones and CVD (Constant Velocity Drives). The standard steel types are far too easily bent.

   Gearing is another problem area on RC model cars. Head on collisions can easily break off gear teeth on Nylon/Plastic Spur Gears and even Bevel Gears inside the Gearbox. Heavy impacts can also loosen nuts and self taping screws that hold the Motor in Position, allowing the Pinion Gear to pull out of mesh slightly and rip the tops of the teeth on your Spur Gear. To avoid this to some degree, fit locking nuts and a new motor mount from time to time, so the self taping screws that hold the motor in position have less chance to come loose.

   Ball joints always cause problems. For top level Radio Controlled model car racing, the plastic ball connectors should be checked and if deemed necessary changed after every meeting. A simple thing like a loose fitting connector breaking free could easily end your race, so better safe than sorry.

   Many New car kits come with Nylon and Sintered Brass Ring type bearings. My advice is to discard these before initial installation and buy a good Hop-up set of Shielded Steel Ball Bearings. Or if you are serious about your racing, Teflon or Ceramic Bearings.

   One final piece of advice about the Setup of your Car. Keep the Centre of Gravity as low as possible. Ride Height is all important. For On Road Drift/Touring cars the Ride Height should be no more than 5mm, for Buggys, Trucks, Truggys and Monster Trucks, as low as possible depending on the track conditions. If Body Roll is a problem, handling can be improved with the use of Stabilizers, Anti roll or Sway Bars, stiffer Tuning Springs and, or thicker Silicon Oil in the Dampers. Also find somewhere to mount the Transponder as low in the Chassis as possible.

For Car Setup Information check out our Hints and Tips page.













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Tamiya Williams-F1-BMW-FW24 - #58303 F201


Hints and Tips

Radio Gear

How to avoid Interference.


1/  The first consideration when installing your Receiver into your Electrically Powered Model is to make sure it is well away from the Negative Battery terminal and the Motor. The Magnetic field can cause stuttering type interference at times of high current draw (i.e., Fast Acceleration)

2/  Make sure the Ariel tube is long enough for the Ariel wire. The tip of this wire is highly sensitive and should be as high and as far away from the Motor as possible (yup, its that magnetic field prob again)

3/  If all else fails, a simple tip that often works for all RC Model enthusiasts is to wrap the receiver in Aluminium Foil, to shield against any magnetic and external radio interference.

4/  As a last resort, to protect against servo twitch, try ferrite beads. (available at Radio Shack or Maplins) These are threaded over the red, white (or yellow) and black wires of each servo.

5/  If you are using a FET Servo, the installation of a choke (a small electrical component) in the positive feed wire will smooth out any current spikes and reduce the possibility of "servo twitch".

6/  Another thing you might try is a "glitch buster" or "stutter stopper". Basically, this is a capacitor that simply plugs into your Radio Receiver and attempts to keep a level voltage supply to the Radio system.

For More Setup Information check out my Hints and Tips page.


Hints and Tips

Tires for RC Models

Sponge (Foam) Tires:

   Sponge Tires can be purchased either pre mounted, glued and trued on the rims, or separately. Fitting the Tires onto the rims can be messy, so here are a few tips to make it a bit easier.
   If you are fitting new Tires on old rims, make sure the old sponge Tire is completely removed. To do this, I recommend using a wood lathe and apiece of wood, at least 300mm long and more than the width of your wheels, with medium grit emery paper stuck to it ... sand paper will also work, but emery is harder wearing ... This will also be used for truing a wheel. (Described later)

How to Mount and Glue Sponge Tires onto Wheels/Rims.

1/   Mount the Tires on the rims. Make sure they are reasonably tight on the rims, too loose and you might have problems.

2/   I find this to be easier if either in the lathe, or on the car itself. (but be careful with that glue)
  Using your thumb and forefinger, lift up the Tire off the rim, then using a small spatula or a thin piece of rigid wood or plastic dipped in glue (I recommend Evo-Stik, Impact Adhesive) slip it in the gap, making sure both the Tire and the rim are smeared. Then lower the Tire back onto the rim and press it down. Turn the Tire approximately 60 degrees and repeat.

3/   Depending on the width of the Tire you may need to repeat the process on the inside also.


How to True Sponge Tires.

   Truing Sponge Tires is essential if you are serious about racing competitively. To do this you will need the piece of wood, as described earlier and a good pair of vernier or digital calipers.
   Sponge Tires will always wear unevenly, weather you race on Carpet or Tarmac. The outside wheels will always end a race smaller than the ones on the inside, so after each race I recommend swapping them over (unless you are fortunate to have a new set for each race) and dont forget to adjust the steering trim on your transmitter before the next race.

1/   Before starting, check each mounted Tire for diameter and order them smallest to largest. Start with the smallest and mount it in the lathe.

2/   Make sure you are wearing safety glasses before you start this procedure: Lay the sanding wood under the Tire so that it can be pivoted up from behind onto the Tire. Start the lathe spinning, so that as you stand infront of the Tire, it is rotating downwards. Slowly lift the sanding wood and try to hold it ridged as it comes up against the Tire. There will be a high point on the Tire that if you hold the bat rigid enough will eventually wear down until the Tire appears completely concentric. at this point stop the lathe and measure the diameter on the inside and outside of the width. If needs be, repeat the process until satisfied.
Repeat for each Tire, matching them in pairs for diameter.
If considered necessary also trim the sides.


For More Setup Information check out my Hints and Tips page.









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