RCScrapyard ► Iconic Vintage Radio Controlled (RC) Model Car Archive ► Tamiya Toyota Celica Gr.B Rally Special. ITEM: #58064
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Tamiya Toyota Celica Gr.B Rally Special - #58064 (Radio Controlled Model Review)

1/12 Scale Electric Rally Car:

  Released by Tamiya on July 28, 1987, this Tamiya model, is of the Toyota Celica that raced in the Rally of Great Britain and has basically the same chassis as the Porsche 959 (#58059) with a few modifications.

  The suspension system for this chassis was innovative but messy to construct and maintain to say the least. The front shocks were coil spring over oil filled and the rear oil filled dampers with separately mounted coil springs. However, they did work reasonably well.

  Improvements were made to the cars handling, durability and stability. The changes consisted of incorporating a front torsion bar and a ball differential was centrally sited for the rear wheels.

Tamiya Toyota Celica Gr.B Rally Special - #58064 - 1:12 Electric Model
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  Maintenance of this model was particularly expensive due to the large number of metal parts used in construction. Spare parts are now very difficult to obtain and the uniqueness of the tires is also a replacement problem.

  The wonderfully detailed body, although difficult to paint, is very striking and realistic but the hard plastic parts were fragile and easily broken.

  The initial high cost of the Toyota Celica meant that few were sold and these cars are much sought after by vintage collectors.


      Rating: 3.53.5 Stars out of 5 Reviewed by: RCScrapyard     Manual.

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Tamiya Toyota Celica Gr.B Rally Special #58064 - Chassis
Tamiya Toyota Celica Gr.B Rally Special #58064 Chassis
Tamiya Toyota Celica Gr.B Rally Special #58064
Tamiya Toyota Celica Gr.B Rally Special #58064 Body Shell

Buying a Used Tamiya Toyota Celica Gr.B
Rally Car (and What to look for)


   Buying a used Tamiya Toyota Celica Gr.B Electric Rally Car, or any used RC Model, has a number of advantages. It is generally cheaper than new, ready built and may come with a variety of expensive hop-ups already installed. Cheap, pre-loved bargains are always becoming available. However, depending on the age of your purchase, it may need a little tender loving care before you can take it out on the back yard.

   The one thing you will always need is an instruction manual. If not supplied with your purchase, they can often be downloaded from the Tamiya website, or purchased separately on eBay. With an instruction manual, any problems with your model Rally Car you may discover can easily be fixed.

Dampers
   When you receive your used Tamiya Rally Car, make a general visual inspection of the chassis, front and rear wishbones, suspension shock towers etc, for any broken parts that may need to be replaced. Then, take a screwdriver and box spanner and check each self tapping screw and nut for security, taking care not to over tighten.

   Next, for those Tamiya models with oil filled shock absorbers, remove them from the chassis and dismantle the coil springs. The damper shafts should push in and pull out with a smooth action. If you feel a jolt as you change direction, this means the oil has leaked out and must be topped up. At the same time, change the O-Ring seals to prevent more leakage. Also check the damper shafts for damage. If they are scratched, change them as soon as possible.

   If the body shell of your Tamiya Toyota Celica Gr.B is broken, ripped or damaged in any way, this can be easily repaired with rubber solution glue. Also, for added protection and if available for your Toyota Celica Gr.B model, fit an under guard to stop dirt and gravel entering the chassis.

Titanium Turnbuckles
   Examine the drive shafts for wear and replace as required. If possible, change them for titanium. The steel shafts wear and bend too easily.

   If you intend to race your Toyota Celica Gr.B Rally Car model at a competitive level, I would also recommend you obtain and fit titanium pivot shafts, turnbuckles, tie rods and steering rods.

   On Belt driven models, the Drive Belts need checking at regular intervals for wear, tension and damage. If deemed necessary, adjust the tensioning pulley until the belt can be depressed in the centre by no more than around 5mm. If the belt was slack, also examine the drive pulleys for wear. The teeth should provide a well seated fit for the belt teeth and not be rounded on the corners. If the belt teeth do not fit snugly, change the pulleys as soon as possible. For top level racing it may be prudent to replace all belts and pulleys after each race meeting.

   For Gear driven models, the gearbox of your used Rally Car should be opened up to check for gear wear and lubrication. A thin coat of grease is often used on internal gears and although this is fine for basic running around on the back yard, if you intend to race your Rally Car at a higher level, this should be removed and replaced with racing oil (ZX1 or Teflon Oil). Of course, this should be reapplied after each race meeting.

Spur Gears
   Gears are a weakness on all Rally Car RC models. Head on collisions can easily damage the gear teeth on nylon and plastic spur gears. Heavy impacts can also loosen the nuts or self tapping screws that hold the Electric Motor in Position, allowing the pinion gear to pull out of mesh slightly and rip the tops off the teeth on your spur gear. To minimise this possibility, fit bolts with locking nuts to the Electric Motor mount and remember to check them for security after every two or three runs.

   Ball joints always cause problems. For top level Electric Rally Car racing, the plastic ball connectors should be checked and if deemed necessary, changed after every meeting. A simple thing like a loose fitting connector popping off, could easily end your race, so better safe than sorry.

Servo Gears
   The Toyota Celica Gr.B steering servo is also prone to damage. In high speed crash situations, the fragile gear teeth of the servo can be broken off, rendering your expensive servo useless, so be sure to obtain a good quality "Servo Saver". Check out my Servo Information article.

   If body roll on your Tamiya Toyota Celica Gr.B is a problem, handling can be improved with the use of stabilizers, anti roll or sway bars, stiffer tuning springs and, or, thicker silicone oil in the dampers.

Ball Bearings
   If your used Tamiya Rally Car comes with plastic and sintered brass bushings (ring type bearings), check the shafts that run in them for wear. Dust and grit can get into these bearings and abrade the shafts. Therefore, you should replace them all with shielded ball bearings. If the model has been run with ring type bearings, you may have to change all the axles and driveshafts. For more information, take a look at my article, How to get the best from your Bearings.

   Finally, good luck with your Toyota Celica Gr.B model and good racing.




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Information and Advice

Electronic Speed Controllers

History:

   ESC were originally developed to be used in conjunction with brushed 27T stock and modified motors in the late 1970s, early 1980s. Compared to modern day Controllers, they were Bulky and heavy, constructed using basic resistors, rheostats, capacitors and transistors, crammed together on a simple circuit board, to provide stepped but smooth acceleration when compared to the old mechanical, servo operated sweeper Speed Controllers. An Electronic Switch to change the direction of current flow was used on some of these early ESC to give reverse operation. Although they were a vast improvement on the old mechanical speedos of the time, they were expensive, jerky to control and prone to burn out if not carefully looked after.

   As new technology became available, improvements were slowly made and with the introduction of the new FET (Field Effect Transistors) and some basic mass produced silicon chips, ESC were made smaller and their reliability gradually improved.

   By the mid 1990s, "regenerative breaking" was developed. This meant that energy that would have been lost slowing down the car by effectively turning the motor into a generator, was harvested and put back into the battery. This of course was long before F1 had KERS (Kinetic Energy Recovery System) and adjustable anti lock breaking was introduced.

   Brushless Motors came to RC in the late 1990s early 2000s, which required a new breed of ESC to be developed to fully utilise the new technology. Ni-Cad Rechargeable Batteries were superseded by Ni-Mh and more recently Li-Po Batteries which provided higher Current output for the ESC to regulate. The latest ESC now use sensors to manage the motor and can be adjusted remotely to suit varying conditions.


Brushed Motor ESC.

   The "Silver Can" Stock Motors that come in a wide number of RC model kits are often accompanied by a 5 Amps to 20 Amps ESC. However, if you want to upgrade to a more powerful Modified Brushed Motor, 20 Amps may not be enough, so you will have to buy a something well over 20 Amps depending on the number of turns of your motor. As a rough guide, a 9 Single has a much higher current requirement than 20 Single.

Brushless Motor ESC.

   ESC for Brushless Motors are in no way compatible with brushed motors. The DC (Direct Current) input from the battery, on brushless ESC is transformed into three phase AC (Alternating Current). Each "phase" connecting three wires on the Brushless motor. By changing the frequency of the output wave the motor will spin faster for acceleration or slower for breaking. Reverse is simply achieved by changing over any two of the three "phases".
   At the time this article was written, Brushless ESC range from 3 Amps to around 300 Amps.
   For beginners I recommended you buy an ESC and Motor Combo, that way you can be sure the ESC Current rating is correct for the Motor.


For More Setup Information check out my Hints and Tips page.



Hints and Tips

Painting a Lexan Body Shell.

   Most RC Model kits come with an unpainted, clear Lexan plastic Body Shell you yourself must prepare and paint. This type of Body Shell is painted on the inside and special spray or brush on Polycarbonate Paints MUST be used.

   The beauty of this is you can go wild and show off your artistic ability, or simply choose your favourite colour and add some choice decals later.

   This article is for those who have never done this kind of thing before and need some basic guidance.


   Firstly, cut off the waste from the body shell with sharp scissors. If required finish off the rounded wheel arches with smooth sandpaper wrapped around a drinks can.

   Any holes for body posts must also be drilled before painting. Place the clear body shell over the model and adjust the posts so the shell is in the desired position. Where the posts touch the shell make a small dot with a marker pen.
Next, pierce small holes in the shell where the dots are from the inside. Place the shell on an old piece of wood and drill the post holes, again, from the inside.

   The next thing to do is clean it inside and out. Any small amount of impurity such as oil or grease could impair the adhesion of the paint.
For this, fill a bowl with water and use a small amount of washing up liquid with a soft sponge. Never use a scourer. Rinse well to ensure no residue remains.

   Most Body Shells come with a set of sticky back paper masks for the windows etc that are positioned on the inside. If not supplied, you will have to either make your own, or use masking tape. Run your thumb nail around the edges of each mask to ensure contact paint can creep into any open area and easily ruin your hard work, so please be vigilant.

   Tip: To protect against paint spilling out onto the outside of the body shell, use masking tape around the outside edges and wheel arches.

   Now you are ready to begin applying your paint. Find a well ventilated area and if spraying, use a breathing mask.
Three or four sprayed, or at least two brushed layers are recommended allowing around thirty minutes between layers.

   Once the paint is fully dry, to protect the paint from scratching, spray or brush over it with one or two layers of clear plastic varnish.

   When the varnish is completely dry, carefully remove the window masks. If necessary, use a modelling knife to lift an edge to grasp between your thumb and finger DO NOT RUSH.

   Decals can now be placed on your body shell. So they adhere better I recommend any square edges are rounded. This reduced the tendency for them to peel off.

For More Setup Information check out my Hints and Tips page.









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