RCScrapyard ► Iconic Vintage Radio Controlled (RC) Model Car Archive ► Tamiya JPS Lotus 79 (Competition Special). Item #58020
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Tamiya JPS Lotus 79 (Competition Special) - #58020 (Radio Controlled Model)

1/10 Scale Electric Formula One Car - F1-CS Chassis:

  Released by Tamiya on April 16, 1980, this model of the JPS Lotus 79, based on the F1-CS chassis, is a detailed copy of the original car, driven by Mario Andretti, that won the 1978 Drivers and Constructors Championship, to break the stranglehold of Ferrari dominance.

Tamiya JPS Lotus 79 Competition Special - #58020

  The Competition Special JPS Lotus 79 has the same chassis that was introduced with the Williams FW07 (CS) #58019 based on a hugely improved FRP plate that is far lighter than previous chassis types and incorporates nylon front uprights.

  The RS-540S Motor gave the JPS Lotus 79 the edge when racing and was extremely popular in the 1980s with serious racing enthusiasts.

  One of the most collectable of all the Tamiya First 100 models, the JPS Lotus 79 has many admirers, not only for its stunning body shell, but also for collectors of Lotus and Colin Chapman memorabilia.

  Because of their popularity, parts and the cars themselves can be expensive, but no collector's cabinet would be complete without this model.


      Rating: 33 Stars out of 5 Reviewed by: RCScrapyard     Manual.





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Tamiya JPS Lotus 79 (CS) #58020 - Chassis
Tamiya JPS Lotus 79 (CS) #58020 Chassis
Tamiya JPS Lotus 79 (CS) #58020
Tamiya JPS Lotus 79 (CS) #58020 Body Shell

General Information and Advice

   For those starting in Radio Controlled Racing, here are a few Hints and Tips: Firstly, buy a Kit not an RTR. That way, if something breaks you will have some idea how to fix it.

   Radio Controlled Model Cars are very fragile and easily broken. The main parts to protect are the Front Wishbones, Suspension Shock Towers, Dampers, Hub Carriers, Kingpins, Uprights and Toe in Blocks, so make sure you have a good strong front bumper and Lexan or Hard Plastic Body Shell and if available for your model, a protective under tray, to prevent grit and dust getting into any moving parts.

   The Steering Servo is also a weakness in high speed crash situations, so get yourself some good strong Servo Mount and Servo Saver. Also I would recommend Titanium Shafts, Turnbuckles, Tie Rods and pivot/steering shafts and if available for your model, lightweight Titanium Drive shafts, dog bones and CVD (Constant Velocity Drives). The standard steel types are far too easily bent.

   Gearing is another problem area on RC model cars. Head on collisions can easily break off gear teeth on Nylon/Plastic Spur Gears and even Bevel Gears inside the Gearbox. Heavy impacts can also loosen nuts and self taping screws that hold the Motor in Position, allowing the Pinion Gear to pull out of mesh slightly and rip the tops of the teeth on your Spur Gear. To avoid this to some degree, fit locking nuts and a new motor mount from time to time, so the self taping screws that hold the motor in position have less chance to come loose.

   Ball joints always cause problems. For top level Radio Controlled model car racing, the plastic ball connectors should be checked and if deemed necessary changed after every meeting. A simple thing like a loose fitting connector breaking free could easily end your race, so better safe than sorry.

   Many New car kits come with Nylon and Sintered Brass Ring type bearings. My advice is to discard these before initial installation and buy a good Hop-up set of Shielded Steel Ball Bearings. Or if you are serious about your racing, Teflon or Ceramic Bearings.

   One final piece of advice about the Setup of your Car. Keep the Centre of Gravity as low as possible. Ride Height is all important. For On Road Drift/Touring cars the Ride Height should be no more than 5mm, for Buggys, Trucks, Truggys and Monster Trucks, as low as possible depending on the track conditions. If Body Roll is a problem, handling can be improved with the use of Stabilizers, Anti roll or Sway Bars, stiffer Tuning Springs and, or thicker Silicon Oil in the Dampers. Also find somewhere to mount the Transponder as low in the Chassis as possible.

For Car Setup Information check out our Hints and Tips page.













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Hints and Tips

Soldering Battery Packs

   Nicad and Nimh batteries sometimes come as six separate matched 1.2 volt cells. These of course have to be soldered to each other in series to produce either a side by side stick pack, or a two times three cell saddle pack.

   Special copper, or silver plated straps must be used to make up these packs and each strap must be prepared before attempting to solder it to the battery cell, by placing a blob of solder at each end of all the straps needed.

   A jig to hold the cells vertical and side by side is advisable. Using electrical solder, with a flux core (flux aids the flow and adhesion of the solder) heat your soldering iron to as hot as it will go. Then with the stick of solder touching on the end of the cell, touch it with the iron. What you want it to spread evenly on the central part of the pole of the cell. Count to 3 seconds. If it doesn't melt the solder in that time, your iron is not hot enough. Battery cells are notoriously very fragile and susceptible to the very high temperatures soldering requires. Anything longer than four or five seconds direct contact with the iron can cause damage to the crystal structure in the cell, so be wary.

   When you have solder on each end of each cell, line them up in the jig, positive to negative and dab a spot of flux on the soldered cells, then position your straps, with the solder coated side faced down, touching the solder on the end of the cell. Now place your hot iron on the strap. Heat will transfer through the strap and melt the solder on the two faces. Again, count to 3 and you should feel the strap drop slightly as the solder fuses with the solder on the cell. Repeat this for each cell on both sides to produce your desired configuration. Finally solder your two wires, previously prepared with connectors, to the pack. Do not solder wires with bare ends to your pack. If these wires were to touch and short out, you could effectively kill your expensive battery pack I use Red for positive and Black for negative, but so long as you know which is which electrical equipment does not like the battery to be connected the wrong way.

For More Setup Information check out my Hints and Tips page.



Hints and Tips

Servo Information

   Servos are found on all kinds of Radio Controlled Models. RC Touring Cars, Buggys, Trucks, Truggys, Monster Trucks, Rock Crawlers, Airplanes, Helicopters, Boats and Ships for Steering, Throttle Control, Rudder Operation and Wing Flaps.

   For complete RC beginners, choosing the right servo can be confusing, so here are a few tips to point you in the right direction.

   The standard, plastic bushed (bearings) type servos are fine to start with but come with plastic/nylon gears that can break easily in collisions. So, to protect your servo gears to some degree, make sure you have a good "servo saver".

   Servo Savers come in a number of forms and are often included as standard on some RC Models. The best ones, in my opinion, are those that use a small spring to absorb the shock of the crash and are simply fitted in place of the servo horn.

   For lightweight, small scale models, plastic geared servos are fine. But for medium to large scale RC models, I would recommend metal or titanium gear servos. These servos are by nature heavier and more costly than the plastic geared ones but are well worth the extra expense, for obvious reasons.

   Digitally controlled Servos use a microprocessor based controller board. They are generally faster, provide better torque and centralise more accurately than the older Analogue types, but again at a higher cost.

   As you advance in experience and skill, you might feel the need for something to match your lightning reflexes. Mos-FET, or simply FET Servos use Ball bearings and will provide the high speed response you crave, but at a price. However, if your budget will stretch to the higher cost, the improvement in performance can make a big difference.

For More Setup Information check out my Hints and Tips page.







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