RCScrapyard ► Tamiya Hotshot. ITEM: #58047 - For Sale in The USA.

Tamiya Buggys RCScrapyard: New, used, second hand radio controlled models, parts and spares.
Established 1999
Tamiya Monster Buggy
Site Search
Complete RC Model Listings    USA - Sitemap UK - Sitemap AU - Sitemap CA - Sitemap ES - Mapa del sitio IE - Sitemap DE - Sitemap FR - Plan du Site IT - Mappa del sito NL - Sitemap AT - Sitemap CH - Sitemap    From Around The WORLD

Tamiya Hotshot - #58047

1/10 Scale Electric RC Buggy:

  Released in April 1985, The Hotshot was Tamiya's first attempt at a 4WD buggy. It sported a mid-mounted motor for good balance and handling on a strong black plastic monocoque chassis. The model was re-released in 2007 (#58391).
  Good grip on cornering was provided by the wide tires and long frame suspension. The unusual double wishbone with single cross car oil-filled suspension front and longitudinally mounted rear shocks gave the car an unconventional appearance that many found off-putting. However, the four wheel shaft drive gave the car great ability in acceleration, breaking and good stability.
  To construct, the Hotshot was not the easiest and was considered a car for the more experienced racer.
 For its time, the Hotshot was very competitive, but it did have its problems. A big turning circle made the car frustrating to drive round tight corners. A fragile front bumper and the brittle uprights also proved problematic.
  The Hotshot kit comes with Nylon/plastic bush type bearings that after a short while actually wear into the metal cup drive shafts - if you are building this kit to race seriously these should be replaced by a full set of steel, rubber shielded ball bearings.
  Recently, the Hotshot has become a collectors must have and well looked after originals and NIB examples have become very expensive.
      Rating: 3.53.5 Stars out of 5 Reviewed by: RCScrapyard     Manual.


★ Tamiya Hotshot ★
Tamiya Hotshot - #58047













USA

Tamiya #58047: For Sale in the USA

Logo


USA - Sitemap UK - Sitemap AU - Sitemap CA - Sitemap ES - Mapa del sitio IE - Sitemap DE - Sitemap FR - Plan du Site IT - Mappa del sito NL - Sitemap AT - Sitemap CH - Sitemap


Tamiya Hotshot #58047 - Chassis
Tamiya Hotshot #58047 Chassis
Tamiya Hotshot #58047 - Body Shell
Tamiya Hotshot #58047 Body Shell

Hints and Tips

Gearing to Win

   Just because you have the latest model, the best available batteries, the most powerful electric motor or nitro engine, doesn't mean you will go out and win everything in sight. The fastest car on the track is rarely the one that wins, it's the one that can accelerate out of corners under control, and remains consistent and efficient from the start to the end of a race.

   In days gone bye, all you had to consider was the number of mili amp hours (Mah) in your battery, and the current draw of your high powered motor. Gearing for a five minute race was a balancing act. But with the development of the new high capacity batteries, brushless motors and smart ESC, all that changed. Now, gearing is more of a matter of what suits your driving style and how quick your reflexes are on the sticks, the trigger and steer wheel of your transmitter. So, where do you start?

   At your local club track, you quickly find the right combination and set-up for your car by talking to the more experienced members. After a while, as your knowledge grows, tweaking a few things here and there can give you that small edge to keep you competitive. So, it follows that on tracks you don't know, you should talk to the locals there, who may be racing a similar model to your own, and adjust your set-up to suit.

   Gearing correctly for any given track is absolutely crucial if your car is to be competitive.

   Too high a gearing may get you in front at the start of a race, but as your motor begins to overheat and lose efficiency, that initial advantage will soon be lost.

   Too low a gearing, and although it may get you past your opposition accelerating out of the corners, you will loose that place again on the fast straights. Gearing low will always get you to the end of the race, but it will hardly ever get you on the winner's rostrum.

   Having said that, on tracks you don't know, initially it's always best to err on the side of low gearing. For your first practice laps on a new track, choose a motor that has a reasonable current draw, and with a fully charged battery, try a race length run, learn the corners what line to enter and exit, where you can accelerate to overtake, and how fast you need to be on the straights to keep up (not overtake) the opposition. After your practice race, check the remaining capacity in your batteries and the temperature of your motor, (keep records of each motor and discover at what temperature a specific motor loses efficiency all this helps when selecting the right gearing.)

   Armed with this knowledge you can then consider how to alter your gearing.

   If the motor is cool (in comparison) and your battery has ample remaining charge, try a larger pinion perhaps one or two teeth more. Don't overdo it.

   An overly hot motor, and low remaining capacity battery speaks for itself. The race timed practice run should have given you an insight to this problem. Obviously, in this instance you must use a smaller, less teeth pinion, or start again with a milder, less powerful motor.

   If the motor is hot, but not too hot, the battery has ample remaining charge, and you did not notice any drop in efficiency towards the end of your practice run, then you are close to the optimum set up for that particular motor.

   Depending on how competitive that set-up is, you can stick with it, maybe tweak a tooth up or down, or repeat the process with a different motor to get you where you want to be.

For More Setup Information check out my Hints and Tips page.



^ TOP ^


    ★ RC Information and Advice ★    





Click Here

Not Here?
Maybe Tomorrow.
♥ Add This Page to your Favorites (Ctrl+D) ♥

★ Tamiya Radio Controlled Model Accessories: ★
540 Electric Motors
Tamiya Motors
Battery Packs
Batteries + Chargers
Bearings and Bearing Sets
Tamiya Bearings
Body Shells
Tamiya Shells
Electronic Speed Controllers
Tamiya ESC
Radio Equipment
Tamiy Radio
Dampers
Tamiya Shocks
Tires
Tamiya Tires
Wheels / Rims
Tamiya Wheels

Hints and Tips

Radio Gear

How to avoid Interference.


1/  The first consideration when installing your Receiver into your Electrically Powered Model is to make sure it is well away from the Negative Battery terminal, and the Motor. The Magnetic field can cause stuttering type interference at times of high current draw (i.e., Fast Acceleration)

2/  Make sure the Ariel tube is long enough for the Ariel wire. The tip of this wire is highly sensitive and should be as high, and as far away from the Motor as possible (yup, its that magnetic field prob again)

3/  If all else fails, a simple tip that often works for all RC Model enthusiasts is to wrap the receiver in Aluminium Foil, to shield against any magnetic and external radio interference.

4/  As a last resort, to protect against servo twitch, try ferrite beads. (available at Radio Shack or Maplins) These are threaded over the red, white (or yellow) and black wires of each servo.

5/  If you are using a FET Servo, the installation of a choke (a small electrical component) in the positive feed wire will smooth out any current spikes and reduce the possibility of "servo twitch".

6/  Another thing you might try is a "glitch buster" or "stutter stopper". Basically, this is a capacitor that simply plugs into your Radio Receiver and attempts to keep a level voltage supply to the Radio system.

For More Setup Information check out my Hints and Tips page.



Trend Times Toy Store


On/Off Road
RC Models:

Other RC Models:

Radio Equipment:

Accessories:
Buggys

Formula One

Monster Trucks

Rock Crawlers

Touring/WRC/Drift Cars

Trucks/Truggys



Airplanes

Boats/Ships

Helicopters

Motorcycles

Submarines

Tanks



Crystal Sets

Receivers

Servos

Transmitters



Batteries

Battery Chargers

Bearings

Body Shells

Dampers (Shocks)

Electric Motors



ESC

Nitro Engines

Pinion Gears

Spur Gears

Tires

Wheels