RCScrapyard ► Iconic Vintage Radio Controlled (RC) Model Car Archive ► Traxxas E-Maxx.
RCScrapyard Radio Controlled Models
Flags

1/10 Scale Electric Monster Truck:

Traxxas E-Maxx (Radio Controlled Model)


Navigation: Sitemap  >  Manufacturers  >  Traxxas

All Manufacturers: Model Types  >  Monster Trucks  >  1/10 Electric Monster Trucks

History, Info (and How To Set-up Tips) for the Traxxas E-Maxx:


  Introduced by Traxxas in 2007, the 4WD E-Maxx - # 3905 - came with an EVX-2 Forward/Reverse/Brake ESC, Dual Titan 550 21T motors and upgraded with Revo Spec suspension, differentials and drive-shafts.

  A 2.4Ghz version of the E-Maxx - # 3903 - was introduced in 2010 and was revised in 2014 - # 39036 and again in 2015 - # 39036-1.

  The Traxxas model was shaft driven, on a molded composite chassis, with gear type differentials, 8 x coil spring over oil filled dampers, universal joint drive-shafts and a full set of ball bearings.

Traxxas E-Maxx
▼ Scroll Down for More Images ▼


  To race the Traxxas E-Maxx, it requires a high level of tuning for improved stability when cornering, to keep it on the track and give you more grip under acceleration. Even the smallest change in your cars settings can make a Big difference. Our simple to follow instruction chart will show how to attain the best Set-up for your personal requirements.

  With simple to follow language, we can point you towards the correct Electric Motor for your E-Maxx and achieve the best Gearing, for your battery and motor combination.

  Learn the secrets the professionals have known for years to get the best from their Bearings using a number of simple tips. See how you can easily avert Radio interference, and the best way to safely Charge your Batteries, for improved acceleration and more run time.









Gas/Nitro Engines Body Shells Radio Transmitters etc Tires Wheels/Rims Electronic Speed Controllers Battery Packs / Chargers Electric Motors












Items For Sale:






Flags

★ Traxxas E-Maxx 3905 - 3903 Chassis ★
Traxxas E-Maxx 3905 - 3903 Chassis

★ Traxxas E-Maxx Chassis ★
Traxxas E-Maxx Chassis


Buying a Used Traxxas E-Maxx
Monster Truck (and What to look for)


   Buying a used Traxxas E-Maxx Electric Monster Truck, or any used RC Model, has a number of advantages. It is generally cheaper than new, ready built and may come with a variety of expensive hop-ups already installed. Cheap, pre-loved bargains are always becoming available. However, depending on the age of your purchase, it may need a little tender loving care before you can take it out on the back yard.

   The one thing you will always need is an instruction manual. If not supplied with your purchase, they can often be downloaded from the Traxxas website, or purchased separately on eBay. With an instruction manual, any problems with your model Monster Truck you may discover can easily be fixed.

Dampers
   When you receive your used Traxxas Monster Truck, make a general visual inspection of the chassis, front and rear wishbones, suspension shock towers etc, for any broken parts that may need to be replaced. Then, take a screwdriver and box spanner and check each self tapping screw and nut for security, taking care not to over tighten.

   Next, for those Traxxas models with oil filled shock absorbers, remove them from the chassis and dismantle the coil springs. The damper shafts should push in and pull out with a smooth action. If you feel a jolt as you change direction, this means the oil has leaked out and must be topped up. At the same time, change the O-Ring seals to prevent more leakage. Also check the damper shafts for damage. If they are scratched, change them as soon as possible.

   If the body shell of your Traxxas E-Maxx is broken, ripped or damaged in any way, this can be easily repaired with rubber solution glue. Also, for added protection and if available for your E-Maxx model, fit an under guard to stop dirt and gravel entering the chassis.

Titanium Turnbuckles
   Examine the drive shafts for wear and replace as required. If possible, change them for titanium. The steel shafts wear and bend too easily.

   If you intend to race your E-Maxx Monster Truck model at a competitive level, I would also recommend you obtain and fit titanium pivot shafts, turnbuckles, tie rods and steering rods.

   The gearbox of your used Monster Truck should be opened up to check for gear wear and lubrication. A thin coat of grease is often used on internal gears and although this is fine for basic running around on the back yard, if you intend to race your Monster Truck at a higher level, this should be removed and replaced with racing oil (ZX1 or Teflon Oil). Of course, this should be reapplied after each race meeting.

Spur Gears
   Gears are a weakness on all Monster Truck RC models. Head on collisions can easily damage the gear teeth on nylon and plastic spur gears. Heavy impacts can also loosen the nuts or self tapping screws that hold the Electric Motor in Position, allowing the pinion gear to pull out of mesh slightly and rip the tops off the teeth on your spur gear. To minimise this possibility, fit bolts with locking nuts to the Electric Motor mount and remember to check them for security after every two or three runs.

   Ball joints always cause problems. For top level Electric Monster Truck racing, the plastic ball connectors should be checked and if deemed necessary changed after every meeting. A simple thing like a loose fitting connector popping off could easily end your race, so better safe than sorry.

Servo Gears
   The E-Maxx steering servo is also prone to damage. In high speed crash situations, the fragile gear teeth of the servo can be broken off, rendering your expensive servo useless, so be sure to obtain a good quality "Servo Saver". Check out my Servo Information article.

   If body roll on your Traxxas E-Maxx is a problem, handling can be improved with the use of stabilizers, anti roll or sway bars, stiffer tuning springs and, or, thicker silicone oil in the dampers.

Ball Bearings
   If your used Traxxas Monster Truck comes with plastic and sintered brass bushings (ring type bearings), check the shafts that run in them for wear. Dust and grit can get into these bearings and abrade the shafts. Therefore, you should replace them all with shielded ball bearings. If the model has been run with ring type bearings, you may have to change all the axles and driveshafts. For more information, take a look at my article, How to get the best from your Bearings.

   Finally, good luck with your E-Maxx model and good racing.


For More on how to Setup your Monster Truck, check out my Hints and Tips page.


^ TOP ^












Manufacturers and Brands Catalogued and Listed by RC-Scrapyard.


   At present, the RC Model Manufacturers, Brands and Distributors covered by us are: ABC Hobby, Academy, Acme Racing, Agama Racing, Amewi, Ansmann Racing, ARRMA, Team Associated, Atomic RC, Axial, AYK, Bolink, BSD Racing, Capricorn, Carisma, Carson, Caster Racing, Cen, Corally, Custom Works, Durango, Duratrax, ECX - Electrix, Exceed RC, FG Modellsport, FS-Racing, FTX, Fujimi, Gmade, GS-Racing, Harm, HBX, Helion, Heng Long, Himoto Racing, Hirobo, Hitari, Hobao, Hong-Nor, Hot Bodies, HPI, HSP, Intech, Integy, Jamara, JQ Products, Kawada, Kyosho, Losi, LRP, Maisto, Mardave, Marui, Maverick, MCD Racing, Megatech, Mugen, New Bright, Nichimo, Nikko, Nkok, Ofna, Pro-Pulse, Protech, PTI, RC4WD, Redcat Racing, RJ-Speed, Robitronic, Schumacher, Seben, Serpent, Smartech, Sportwerks, Step-Up, Tamiya, Team-C Racing, Team Magic, Thunder Tiger, Tomy, Top Racing, Traxxas, Trinity, Tyco, Vaterra RC, Venom, VRX Racing, WLToys, X-Factory, Xmods, Xpress, Xray, XTM, Yankee RC, Yokomo, ZD Racing and Zipzaps.

   This is an ongoing project, with new and "lost in time" RC Model Brands being added as they are found and although most of those listed above have been covered in relative detail, some are still being researched and will be completed in the near future.


















Hints and Tips


Electric Motors for RC Models

Winds and Turns

Q/  What does 15x2 or 17x3 mean?
A/  The first number relates to the number of times the wires are wound round each of the 3 armature segments, the second number relates to the number of wires side by side. So a 15x2 would have 2 wires laid side by side and wrapped around each segment 15 times.

Q/  What is the difference in performance between a Low Turn motor (eg 11x1) and a High Turn motor (eg 27x1)?
A/  A Motor with Less Turns like an 11x1 means high current draw from the batteries which corresponds to less runtime, but More Power (Torque or Punch) Best for tracks with lots of corners and short straights where fast acceleration is needed. (use a small pinion)
Motors with More Turns like a 27x1 give you More runtime, but Less Power. So you get a smoother response and are therefore easier to drive. Better for less experienced drivers and Long straight, sweeping corner tracks. (with a large pinion) This is correct for Brushed, Modified and Stock Motors as well as Brushless Motors.

Q/  How do the number of winds effect a motor?
A/  A Motor with More Winds (number of wires eg 13x5) is less demanding on the battery and smoother in acceleration. Best for low grip, slippery tracks.
A Low Wind Motor (eg 11x1) is more punchy and can be difficult to handle. Best on high grip, hot weather Tarmac, or indoor carpet, high acceleration, low speed tracks.

Advance and Retard

Q/  What is Advance and Retard?
A/  On the Endbell of a Modified Motor (where the brushes fit) you will find two screws that hold the Endbell to the Can. If these screws are slackened off slightly the Endbell can then be twisted either Clockwise (Advance) or Anticlockwise (Retard). On Sensorless Brushless Motors this adjustment can generally be made in a similar way (although there are some Brushless Motors that have fixed timing for Spec level racing). Sensored Motors can be adjusted via the ESC.

Q/  What does "Advancing" the Endbell position do?
A/  Advancing the Endbell Reduces runtime, increases Punch (acceleration) and RPM to give a higher top speed.
On the down side, for Brushed Motors, the brushes wear faster and the increased current draw creates more arcing thus increased heat and Commutator (Comm) wear. Brushless Motors can lose some efficiency at the end of a race because of overheating due to increased current draw.

Q/  What does "Retarding" the Endbell position do?
A/  On both Brushed and Brushless Motors, Retarding the Endbell Increases runtime, decreases Punch (acceleration) and RPM to give a lower top speed and for Brushed Motors, brush wear and Commutator (Comm) wear is reduced.

Brushed Motor Basics

Q/  What is the effect of hard and soft Brushes?
A/  Basically, Hard brushes give a lower current draw, so consequently give longer run times and lower torque so less punch (acceleration)
Soft Brushes on the other hand increase current draw thus give higher torque and increased acceleration. Of course the down side of this is that Soft brushes wear much faster and must be changed more often. (I change mine when they get to around 5mm)

Q/  How does changing the brush spring change the motor?
A/  If you fit Stiffer Brush Springs your motor will have More power at low revs and also a lower top speed. I only ever fit stiff springs on bumpy tracks to reduce brush bounce.
Weaker springs reduce power but increase RPM so give less acceleration but a higher top speed. Good for long, sweeping, smooth tracks, where you can carry good speed through the corners.

For More Setup Information check out my Hints and Tips page.







Hints and Tips

On Road Drifting

   Drifting is the greatest fun you can have on four wheels, but it isn't as easy as it might look. There are lots of different methods and ideas on how it should be done and it takes lots of practice to get it right.

   On the street or in the parking lot, drifting is fine, but until you have had hours and hours of practice to master the technique, don't try it on your local race track. If you don't have the total control of your car, you will not make many friends amongst your immediate competitors.

   Controlled Drifting is a beautiful thing when done correctly and in this article I will endeavour to give you a few pointers on where to start. After that, your own personal style will soon blossom.

   As I mentioned before, there are a number of different ideas about drifting, but basically this is what you do.

   Consider a 180 degree turn. Enter the corner at speed, start to turn a little sooner than you might, then just before the apex, touch the breaks for a split second, enough to break the rear of the car free as you enter to turn. When the car begins to slide sideways, steer into the slide, increase the throttle, just enough to balance the car as it drifts around the turn. Coming out of the corner, steer the car straight and apply full throttle.

   Often referred to as a power slide, drifting is much more fun than the basic "Rounding" style, described in a previous article, but also takes more skill, not just in its execution, but in car set-up.

   A little "body-roll" is the thing to aim for when setting up a drifting car, but be careful. With too much body-roll, the car will be difficult to control and tumble sideways off the track. Too little and the weight transfer to the leading wheels will not be enough to induce the slide. A lot of trial and error, with tuning springs, damper oil, damper pistons, stabilisers, tires and inserts is required to get your car as you want it, but believe me, if you can get it right, it will be well worth all your effort.

For More Setup Information check out my Hints and Tips page.










On/Off Road
RC Models:

Radio
Equipment:

Accessories: