RCScrapyard ► Iconic Vintage Radio Controlled (RC) Model Car Archive ► Serpent S120 LTX.
RCScrapyard Radio Controlled Models
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1/12 Scale Electric Pan Car:

Serpent S120 LTX - # 410005 (Radio Controlled Model Review)


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History, Info (and How To Set-up Tips) for the Serpent S120 LTX:


  Introduced by Serpent in 2012, the 2WD S120 LTX Pan Car - # 410005 - came as a basic chassis: No wheels, tires or bodyshell.

  The S120 LT was based on a carbon fibre plate chassis, with a Link system, a ball differential, central coil spring over oil filled damper, with Tube system and a full set of ball bearings.

Serpent S120 LTX
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  To race the Serpent S120 LTX, it calls for fine tuning to attain better steering response and improve grip when cornering so you don't slide off the side of the track. Minute changes can make huge advancements. Our easy to understand list will show you how and lead you to the optimum Set-up to put you in front of the rest on the track.

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★ Serpent S120 LTX ★
Serpent S120 LTX

★ Serpent S120 LTX ★
Serpent S120 LTX

★ Serpent S120 LTX Chassis ★
Serpent S120 LTX Chassis

★ Serpent S120 LTX Chassis ★
Serpent S120 LTX Chassis


General Information and Advice

   For those starting in Radio Controlled Racing, here are a few Hints and Tips: Firstly, buy a Kit not an RTR. That way, if something breaks you will have some idea how to fix it.

   Radio Controlled Model Cars are very fragile and easily broken. The main parts to protect are the Front Wishbones, Suspension Shock Towers, Dampers, Hub Carriers, Kingpins, Uprights and Toe in Blocks, so make sure you have a good strong front bumper and Lexan or Hard Plastic Body Shell and if available for your model, a protective under tray, to prevent grit and dust getting into any moving parts.

   The Steering Servo is also a weakness in high speed crash situations, so get yourself some good strong Servo Mount and Servo Saver. Also I would recommend Titanium Shafts, Turnbuckles, Tie Rods and pivot/steering shafts and if available for your model, lightweight Titanium Drive shafts, dog bones and CVD (Constant Velocity Drives). The standard steel types are far too easily bent.

   Gearing is another problem area on RC model cars. Head on collisions can easily break off gear teeth on Nylon/Plastic Spur Gears and even Bevel Gears inside the Gearbox. Heavy impacts can also loosen nuts and self taping screws that hold the Motor in Position, allowing the Pinion Gear to pull out of mesh slightly and rip the tops of the teeth on your Spur Gear. To avoid this to some degree, fit locking nuts and a new motor mount from time to time, so the self taping screws that hold the motor in position have less chance to come loose.

   Ball joints always cause problems. For top level Radio Controlled model car racing, the plastic ball connectors should be checked and if deemed necessary changed after every meeting. A simple thing like a loose fitting connector breaking free could easily end your race, so better safe than sorry.

   Many New car kits come with Nylon and Sintered Brass Ring type bearings. My advice is to discard these before initial installation and buy a good Hop-up set of Shielded Steel Ball Bearings. Or if you are serious about your racing, Teflon or Ceramic Bearings.

   One final piece of advice about the Setup of your Car. Keep the Centre of Gravity as low as possible. Ride Height is all important. For On Road Drift/Touring cars the Ride Height should be no more than 5mm, for Buggys, Trucks, Truggys and Monster Trucks, as low as possible depending on the track conditions. If Body Roll is a problem, handling can be improved with the use of Stabilizers, Anti roll or Sway Bars, stiffer Tuning Springs and, or thicker Silicon Oil in the Dampers. Also find somewhere to mount the Transponder as low in the Chassis as possible.

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Or, check out our RC Model Car Setup Guide

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Manufacturers and Brands Catalogued and Listed by RC-Scrapyard.


   At present, the RC Model Manufacturers, Brands and Distributors covered by us are: ABC Hobby, Academy, Acme Racing, Agama Racing, Amewi, Ansmann Racing, ARRMA, Team Associated, Atomic RC, Axial, AYK, Bolink, BSD Racing, Capricorn, Carisma, Carson, Caster Racing, Cen, Corally, Custom Works, Durango, Duratrax, ECX - Electrix, Exceed RC, FG Modellsport, FS-Racing, FTX, Fujimi, Gmade, GS-Racing, Harm, HBX, Helion, Heng Long, Himoto Racing, Hirobo, Hitari, Hobao, Hong-Nor, Hot Bodies, HPI, HSP, Intech, Integy, Jamara, JQ Products, Kawada, Kyosho, Losi, LRP, Maisto, Mardave, Marui, Maverick, MCD Racing, Megatech, Mugen, New Bright, Nichimo, Nikko, Nkok, Ofna, Pro-Pulse, Protech, PTI, RC4WD, Redcat Racing, RJ-Speed, Robitronic, Schumacher, Seben, Serpent, Smartech, Sportwerks, Step-Up, Tamiya, Team-C Racing, Team Magic, Thunder Tiger, Tomy, Top Racing, Traxxas, Trinity, Tyco, Vaterra RC, Venom, VRX Racing, WLToys, X-Factory, Xmods, Xpress, Xray, XTM, Yankee RC, Yokomo, ZD Racing and Zipzaps.

   This is an ongoing project, with new and "lost in time" RC Model Brands being added as they are found and although most of those listed above have been covered in relative detail, some are still being researched and will be completed in the near future.





















★ Serpent S120 LTX Chassis ★
Serpent S120 LTX Chassis


Hints and Tips

Radio Frequencies

   After buying your first car, it won't be long before you need more than simply bashing around the back yard, or out on the street. So you will be looking around to find a club that is not too far away where you can do some serious racing.

   Before you can start racing, you will need at least three different sets of crystal frequencies. The race organisers will note down all your available frequencies when you register at the track and allocate one of those frequencies to you for your heat. To avoid change over problems from one heat to the next, they generally try to give you a frequency that no one in the heat before or after is using, but always check to make sure before you put your car down on the track and switch on.

   There is nothing more annoying than to be in the middle of your best qualifying race and some idiot switching on their transmitter in the pits, on your frequency. Not only could it spoil your race, but it could cost you a lot of money if at the time you are travelling at top speed along the straight, loose control and crash head on into the wall. Just imagine how you would feel.

   Now, imagine this scenario. You are at your RC meeting and you need to run your car to check out some changes you have made, either after a crash repair, to adjust the steering servo, or just fine tune your car before the next race. What do you do?

   Before you switch on anything, the first thing to do is check with race control, to make sure that none of the racers presently on the track or in the next heat are on the same frequency you want to use. The people in charge are always willing to help in these situations and if none of your three available frequencies are safe for you to use, they will often lend you some crystals, sometimes for a small fee.

   Some of the bigger meetings use a board displaying all the possible frequencies, indicating which of those frequencies are in use at that time and which are available for others to use. To claim a particular frequency you simply take a peg or marker off the board so that others wanting to check their car out can not use the same frequency as you. Before the next heat, this board is updated and any missing pegs must be accounted for. So obviously the best time to claim your frequency, is at the start of a heat and you must return it before the start of the next heat.

   So, be cautious, use the protocols at your track as they should be used and you won't make any enemies you know it makes sense.

For More Setup Information check out my Hints and Tips page.







Hints and Tips

Roll Center

   One of the least understood settings on RC model cars is concept of roll center. The simple definition of roll center is a point in space that the chassis rolls from side to side as the car maneuvers around a corner.

   To calculate roll center you have to consider things like the height of the axles, the inside and outside camber link positioning, the length of the suspension arms and the location of their inside pivot point. Sounds complicated doesn't it and in truth it is.

   On all RC model cars, most of the cars weight is above the chassis and the center of gravity of the car is not only from front to rear, but also from top to bottom. This point is called the "true" center of gravity and is the point around which the weight of the car will want to roll from side to side, but it is the roll center of the chassis that the chassis will actually roll around, not the center of gravity.

   Once you have determined the positions of roll center and center of gravity, you can calculate the "roll moment". It is this that determines how easily the chassis will roll from side to side.

   But what does all this mean? I hear you ask. Well, it gives you some insight to what changing the position of your camber links can do to the way your car handles.

   Lowering the outside camber links, lowers the roll center, so conversely, raising the outside link position raises the roll center.

   Lowering the inside camber link position raises roll center and raising the inside camber link position, lowers the roll center.

   Any of these adjustments will affect the "roll moment" and therefore you have some control of body roll.

   The length of the camber link bars affects the speed of roll center change as the car driver around corners. Longer links increase the rate of change. Shorter links decreases the rate of change.

   Adjustments to the roll center will change the way the car reacts in a number of ways.

   Lowering the front roll center gives more steering under acceleration, but the car is less responsive. Ideal for smooth high grip tracks, with long sweeping corners.

   Raising the front roll center provides less steering when accelerating out of the corner, but the car feels more responsive and is less prone to traction roll. Best for high grip twisty tracks.

   Lower rear roll center improves grip under acceleration, but reduced grip when breaking. Helpful to avoid traction roll as you enter the corner and tracks with low grip to increase traction.

   Higher rear roll center gives you less under acceleration, but the car is more responsive. Works for high grip twisty tracks to reduce traction roll.

For More Setup Information check out my Hints and Tips page.










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