RCScrapyard ► Iconic Vintage Radio Controlled (RC) Model Car Archive ► Kyosho Plazma Ra.
RCScrapyard Radio Controlled Models
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1/12 Scale Electric Pan Car:

Kyosho Plazma Ra - 30422 (Radio Controlled Model)


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History, Info (and How To Set-up Tips) for the Kyosho Plazma Ra:


  Released by Kyosho in 2012, the Plazma Ra - # 30422 - pan car, comes with ball differential, coil spring over oil filled damper and a full set of ball bearings.

Kyosho Plazma Ra - 1:12 Electric Pan Car
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  To race the Kyosho Plazma Ra, it calls for fine tuning to attain better steering response and improve grip when cornering so you don't slide off the side of the track. Minute changes can make huge advancements. Our easy to understand list will show you how and lead you to the optimum Set-up to put you in front of the rest on the track.

  We give you all the basic information you need to guide you to the best Electric Motor for your Plazma Ra and achieve the best Gearing, to get you in front on the track and keep you there.

  Find out how the worlds top professional RC racers get improved efficiency from their Bearings employing a number of sensible ideas. Find the way to avoid Radio interference, and basic instruction on how to Charge your Batteries, so they will last longer and provide improved power.









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★ Kyosho Plazma Ra - 30422 ★
Kyosho Plazma Ra - 30422 Chassis

★ Kyosho Plazma Ra - 30422 Chassis ★
Kyosho Plazma Ra - 30422 Chassis


General Information and Advice

   For those starting in Radio Controlled Racing, here are a few Hints and Tips: Firstly, buy a Kit not an RTR. That way, if something breaks you will have some idea how to fix it.

   Radio Controlled Model Cars are very fragile and easily broken. The main parts to protect are the Front Wishbones, Suspension Shock Towers, Dampers, Hub Carriers, Kingpins, Uprights and Toe in Blocks, so make sure you have a good strong front bumper and Lexan or Hard Plastic Body Shell and if available for your model, a protective under tray, to prevent grit and dust getting into any moving parts.

   The Steering Servo is also a weakness in high speed crash situations, so get yourself some good strong Servo Mount and Servo Saver. Also I would recommend Titanium Shafts, Turnbuckles, Tie Rods and pivot/steering shafts and if available for your model, lightweight Titanium Drive shafts, dog bones and CVD (Constant Velocity Drives). The standard steel types are far too easily bent.

   Gearing is another problem area on RC model cars. Head on collisions can easily break off gear teeth on Nylon/Plastic Spur Gears and even Bevel Gears inside the Gearbox. Heavy impacts can also loosen nuts and self taping screws that hold the Motor in Position, allowing the Pinion Gear to pull out of mesh slightly and rip the tops of the teeth on your Spur Gear. To avoid this to some degree, fit locking nuts and a new motor mount from time to time, so the self taping screws that hold the motor in position have less chance to come loose.

   Ball joints always cause problems. For top level Radio Controlled model car racing, the plastic ball connectors should be checked and if deemed necessary changed after every meeting. A simple thing like a loose fitting connector breaking free could easily end your race, so better safe than sorry.

   Many New car kits come with Nylon and Sintered Brass Ring type bearings. My advice is to discard these before initial installation and buy a good Hop-up set of Shielded Steel Ball Bearings. Or if you are serious about your racing, Teflon or Ceramic Bearings.

   One final piece of advice about the Setup of your Car. Keep the Centre of Gravity as low as possible. Ride Height is all important. For On Road Drift/Touring cars the Ride Height should be no more than 5mm, for Buggys, Trucks, Truggys and Monster Trucks, as low as possible depending on the track conditions. If Body Roll is a problem, handling can be improved with the use of Stabilizers, Anti roll or Sway Bars, stiffer Tuning Springs and, or thicker Silicon Oil in the Dampers. Also find somewhere to mount the Transponder as low in the Chassis as possible.

For Car Setup Information check out our Hints and Tips page.

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Manufacturers and Brands Catalogued and Listed by RC-Scrapyard.


   At present, the RC Model Manufacturers, Brands and Distributors covered by us are: ABC Hobby, Academy, Acme Racing, Agama Racing, Amewi, Ansmann Racing, ARRMA, Team Associated, Atomic RC, Axial, AYK, Bolink, BSD Racing, Capricorn, Carisma, Carson, Caster Racing, Cen, Corally, Custom Works, Durango, Duratrax, ECX - Electrix, Exceed RC, FG Modellsport, FS-Racing, FTX, Fujimi, Gmade, GS-Racing, Harm, HBX, Helion, Heng Long, Himoto Racing, Hirobo, Hitari, Hobao, Hong-Nor, Hot Bodies, HPI, HSP, Intech, Integy, Jamara, JQ Products, Kawada, Kyosho, Losi, LRP, Maisto, Mardave, Marui, Maverick, MCD Racing, Megatech, Mugen, New Bright, Nichimo, Nikko, Nkok, Ofna, Pro-Pulse, Protech, PTI, RC4WD, Redcat Racing, RJ-Speed, Robitronic, Schumacher, Seben, Serpent, Smartech, Sportwerks, Step-Up, Tamiya, Team-C Racing, Team Magic, Thunder Tiger, Tomy, Top Racing, Traxxas, Trinity, Tyco, Vaterra RC, Venom, VRX Racing, WLToys, X-Factory, Xmods, Xpress, Xray, XTM, Yankee RC, Yokomo, ZD Racing and Zipzaps.

   This is an ongoing project, with new and "lost in time" RC Model Brands being added as they are found and although most of those listed above have been covered in relative detail, some are still being researched and will be completed in the near future.


















Hints and Tips

Wings

   When you think of the Wing or the spoiler on any RC model car, you immediately think of down-force, but which wing is best for your model and what setting should it have?

   When you first build your car, most drivers will cut out the wing supplied in the kit, put it on the car and forget about it. It's only when the new kid at your local track, starts beating you that you begin thinking about changing a few things to make your car faster and one of the easiest changes you could make is to your wing.

   Choosing a wing for off-road can be confusing, so first of all you need to understand just what your wing can do for the way your car handles. Down-force equals traction and traction is what you need for controlled acceleration. The correct wing on your car can give you a good proportion of that down-force and if it has high side panels, it can also improve cornering and straight line stability.

   The first thing you need to consider when choosing your wing is the size. A small wing may not give as much down-force as a larger one, but it also weighs less and provides less speed restricting drag. So, if the track you will be racing on has good traction naturally and has nice long straights, a small wing may be an advantage. Large wings will obviously give you more down-force and on tracks with poor traction and short straights, will be the obvious choice. If rear end grip on cornering is also a problem, go for those high side panels as well.

   Tuning your wing angle can also improve the way it performs. A more acute angle will give you improved grip, but will also increase drag. If you go more flat with your wing, down-force is reduced, but drag is also reduced, so setting your wing angle is simply a matter of trial and error to suit your needs.

   The way the wing is mounted on your car must also be considered. If it uses a wire, it has a tendency to flex as it pushes down; this obviously flattens the angle as you speed along the straights, reducing drag, which could be good in some cases, but bad in others. If your wing is held by a rigid alloy or plastic support, the previous consideration is not a problem. Down-force is maintained as constant, but so is the drag.

   Changing and tuning things like your wing may seem futile if you are the big fish in a small pond and winning at your local track is not a problem. But if you ever go to the bigger ponds, its considering things like this that can keep you competitive.

For More Setup Information check out my Hints and Tips page.







Hints and Tips

Sway Bars

   On most forms of RC model cars, Sway Bars, also referred to as Stabilizers, Torsion Bars, or more commonly in some parts as Anti Roll Bars, are often nothing more than a short length of spring steel, clamped to the chassis or sometimes the gearbox of the car, extending out to the lower wishbones direct or connected to the wishbones using short adjustable or fixed length links and ball joints, depending on their position.

   The principal behind the Sway Bar is simple. As the car enters a corner, weight is transferred to the outside wheels, the chassis rolls due to inertia and the suspension dips and grip on the inside wheels is reduced. In an effort to counter this dipping effect and transfer some grip back to the inside wheels to improve traction as you exit the corner, the sway bars transfer the dip of the outside, to pull down the inside wishbones, improving grip on the outside wheels and improving overall stability.

   Sounds complicated I know, but for some tracks sway bars can be a useful tool when you have exhausted all other options to correct your handling problems.

   Tuning your Sway Bars is quite easy. Some manufacturers do offer colour coded tuning sets with varying thicknesses of spring steel wire, but the best way is to change the position the bar is attached to the wishbone, or on some variations you have the option of positioning the link on the Sway Bar itself. By simply moving a small collet clamped along the short length of the bar. Closer to the central pivot point reduces the leverage of the bar and effectively increasing its resistance, further away from the pivot point reducing resistance. More fine tuning can be achieved by adjusting the length of the turnbuckle link (if available) to pre load the bar.

   Personally, before I ever installed any sway bars I would always try changing damper tuning springs and oil viscosity settings, especially if the track was uneven and bumpy, in which case the effectiveness of the bars was minimal if at all.

   For those more into Drifting, Sway Bars can be an easy way to fine tune your car. A single turn on the turnbuckle links can be a way to simply increase or decrease wheel traction that minute amount you need to get the perfect balance.

   For more on how to use Sway Bars check out our Set-up tips page linked below.

For More Setup Information check out my Hints and Tips page.










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