RCScrapyard ► Iconic Vintage Radio Controlled (RC) Model Car Archive ► AYK Bun Bun Racer
RCScrapyard Radio Controlled Models
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1/12 Scale Electric On-Road Car:

AYK Bun Bun Racer (Radio Controlled Model Review)


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History + Information (and How To Set-up Tips):


  Introduced by AYK Aoyagi Metals Co circa 1989, the 2WD Bun Bun Racer was a fun car with a number of bodyshell option kits: Porsche 956, Lotus 99t, Mercedes Benz 190 and Pontiac Trans-Am. A number of Bun Bun Racer F1 kits were also produced: Marlbro Mclaren, Renault Camel and Williams.

  The model is based on a double deck type chassis, with a rheostat type servo operated speed controller and motor with plastic gears.

AYK Bun Bun Racer
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  To race the AYK Bun Bun Racer, it requires a high level of tuning for improved stability when cornering, to keep it on the track and give you more grip under acceleration. Even the smallest change in your cars settings can make a Big difference. Our simple to follow instruction chart will show how to attain the best Set-up for your personal requirements.

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★ AYK Bun Bun Racer ★
AYK Bun Bun Racer

★ AYK Bun Bun Racer Chassis ★
AYK Bun Bun Racer Chassis

★ AYK Bun Bun Racer Chassis ★
AYK Bun Bun Racer Chassis


General Information and Advice

   For those starting in Radio Controlled Racing, here are a few Hints and Tips: Firstly, buy a Kit not an RTR. That way, if something breaks you will have some idea how to fix it.

   Radio Controlled Model Cars are very fragile and easily broken. The main parts to protect are the Front Wishbones, Suspension Shock Towers, Dampers, Hub Carriers, Kingpins, Uprights and Toe in Blocks, so make sure you have a good strong front bumper and Lexan or Hard Plastic Body Shell and if available for your model, a protective under tray, to prevent grit and dust getting into any moving parts.

   The Steering Servo is also a weakness in high speed crash situations, so get yourself some good strong Servo Mount and Servo Saver. Also I would recommend Titanium Shafts, Turnbuckles, Tie Rods and pivot/steering shafts and if available for your model, lightweight Titanium Drive shafts, dog bones and CVD (Constant Velocity Drives). The standard steel types are far too easily bent.

   Gearing is another problem area on RC model cars. Head on collisions can easily break off gear teeth on Nylon/Plastic Spur Gears and even Bevel Gears inside the Gearbox. Heavy impacts can also loosen nuts and self taping screws that hold the Motor in Position, allowing the Pinion Gear to pull out of mesh slightly and rip the tops of the teeth on your Spur Gear. To avoid this to some degree, fit locking nuts and a new motor mount from time to time, so the self taping screws that hold the motor in position have less chance to come loose.

   Ball joints always cause problems. For top level Radio Controlled model car racing, the plastic ball connectors should be checked and if deemed necessary changed after every meeting. A simple thing like a loose fitting connector breaking free could easily end your race, so better safe than sorry.

   Many New car kits come with Nylon and Sintered Brass Ring type bearings. My advice is to discard these before initial installation and buy a good Hop-up set of Shielded Steel Ball Bearings. Or if you are serious about your racing, Teflon or Ceramic Bearings.

   One final piece of advice about the Setup of your Car. Keep the Centre of Gravity as low as possible. Ride Height is all important. For On Road Drift/Touring cars the Ride Height should be no more than 5mm, for Buggys, Trucks, Truggys and Monster Trucks, as low as possible depending on the track conditions. If Body Roll is a problem, handling can be improved with the use of Stabilizers, Anti roll or Sway Bars, stiffer Tuning Springs and, or thicker Silicon Oil in the Dampers. Also find somewhere to mount the Transponder as low in the Chassis as possible.

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Or, check out our RC Model Car Setup Guide

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Manufacturers and Brands Catalogued and Listed by RC-Scrapyard.


   At present, the RC Model Manufacturers, Brands and Distributors covered by us are: ABC Hobby, Academy, Acme Racing, Agama Racing, Amewi, Ansmann Racing, ARRMA, Team Associated, Atomic RC, Axial, AYK, Bolink, BSD Racing, Capricorn, Carisma, Carson, Caster Racing, Cen, Corally, Custom Works, Durango, Duratrax, ECX - Electrix, Exceed RC, FG Modellsport, FS-Racing, FTX, Fujimi, Gmade, GS-Racing, Harm, HBX, Helion, Heng Long, Himoto Racing, Hirobo, Hitari, Hobao, Hong-Nor, Hot Bodies, HPI, HSP, Intech, Integy, Jamara, JQ Products, Kawada, Kyosho, Losi, LRP, Maisto, Mardave, Marui, Maverick, MCD Racing, Megatech, Mugen, New Bright, Nichimo, Nikko, Nkok, Ofna, Pro-Pulse, Protech, PTI, RC4WD, Redcat Racing, RJ-Speed, Robitronic, Schumacher, Seben, Serpent, Smartech, Sportwerks, Step-Up, Tamiya, Team-C Racing, Team Magic, Thunder Tiger, Tomy, Top Racing, Traxxas, Trinity, Tyco, Vaterra RC, Venom, VRX Racing, WLToys, X-Factory, Xmods, Xpress, Xray, XTM, Yankee RC, Yokomo, ZD Racing and Zipzaps.

   This is an ongoing project, with new and "lost in time" RC Model Brands being added as they are found and although most of those listed above have been covered in relative detail, some are still being researched and will be completed in the near future.


















Hints and Tips

Choosing a Transmitter

   When you first started in RC, you may have purchased a package that came with the car kit, motor, battery, charger, ESC and radio system complete. The transmitter was probably just a basic steer wheel, or stick type, with nothing more than forward, reverse, left, right and simple trim settings to centralise the servo and ESC.

   After a while, as your enthusiasm grows and your experience increases, you will want to move on to a better radio system, with more setting options, but where do you begin?

   Choosing the right transmitter is a personal thing. It has to feel right, have the balance you like, not be too bulky for your hand size and have all the features you might need to set up your car to your driving style.

   Transmitters these days are highly sophisticated pieces of engineering and once you choose your transmitter you will probably stick with it for the rest of your competitive career.

   Don't just go for the one you see in a review that looks and sounds like the best thing there could ever be and comes at a bargain price. Then when it arrives through the post and you get it in your hands it just doesn't have the feel you thought it would have. Sits awkwardly in your hands and is so complicated to set up you need a university degree to understand it.

   Talk to the experienced racers at your local track, ask them their opinion, see what their transmitter is like and if they will allow you to, hold it in your hands and see how it feels. All the best buys in life are made by recommendation. Then, once you have some idea what you are looking for, look on the internet for that model to get the best price, or go to a dealer and check out the latest models.

   Frequency choice depends on where in the world you live and what form of RC you are into. Fortunately, most of the top end transmitters can change to different frequency ranges by simply fitting a different module, so if you ever move up to an international level, you don't have to buy a new transmitter, just a module and receiver.

For More Setup Information check out my Hints and Tips page.







Hints and Tips

Tires for RC Models

Sponge (Foam) Tires:


   Sponge Tires can be purchased either pre mounted, glued and trued on the rims, or separately. Fitting the Tires onto the rims can be messy, so here are a few tips to make it a bit easier.
   If you are fitting new Tires on old rims, make sure the old sponge Tire is completely removed. To do this, I recommend using a wood lathe and apiece of wood, at least 300mm long and more than the width of your wheels, with medium grit emery paper stuck to it ... sand paper will also work, but emery is harder wearing ... This will also be used for truing a wheel. (Described later)

How to Mount and Glue Sponge Tires onto Wheels/Rims.


1/   Mount the Tires on the rims. Make sure they are reasonably tight on the rims, too loose and you might have problems.

2/   I find this to be easier if either in the lathe, or on the car itself. (but be careful with that glue)
  Using your thumb and forefinger, lift up the Tire off the rim, then using a small spatula or a thin piece of rigid wood or plastic dipped in glue (I recommend Evo-Stik, Impact Adhesive) slip it in the gap, making sure both the Tire and the rim are smeared. Then lower the Tire back onto the rim and press it down. Turn the Tire approximately 60 degrees and repeat.

3/   Depending on the width of the Tire you may need to repeat the process on the inside also.


How to True Sponge Tires.


   Truing Sponge Tires is essential if you are serious about racing competitively. To do this you will need the piece of wood, as described earlier and a good pair of vernier or digital calipers.
   Sponge Tires will always wear unevenly, weather you race on Carpet or Tarmac. The outside wheels will always end a race smaller than the ones on the inside, so after each race I recommend swapping them over (unless you are fortunate to have a new set for each race) and dont forget to adjust the steering trim on your transmitter before the next race.

1/   Before starting, check each mounted Tire for diameter and order them smallest to largest. Start with the smallest and mount it in the lathe.

2/   Make sure you are wearing safety glasses before you start this procedure: Lay the sanding wood under the Tire so that it can be pivoted up from behind onto the Tire. Start the lathe spinning, so that as you stand infront of the Tire, it is rotating downwards. Slowly lift the sanding wood and try to hold it ridged as it comes up against the Tire. There will be a high point on the Tire that if you hold the bat rigid enough will eventually wear down until the Tire appears completely concentric. at this point stop the lathe and measure the diameter on the inside and outside of the width. If needs be, repeat the process until satisfied.
Repeat for each Tire, matching them in pairs for diameter.
If considered necessary also trim the sides.


For More Setup Information check out my Hints and Tips page.










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