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1/12 Scale Electric On-Road Car:

Academy SP3 Matiz (Radio Controlled Model)


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History + Information (and How To Set-up Tips):


  Introduced by Academy Minicraft circa 2002, the 2WD SP3 Matiz racing car chassis - # 1579 - came 90% assembled, with an RS-380 motor and mechanical speed controller.

  The model is based on a molded plastic chassis, with a ball differential, coil spring damper, high grip radial tires and ball bearings.

Academy SP3 Matiz
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  To race the Academy SP3 Matiz, it requires a high level of tuning for improved stability when cornering, to keep it on the track and give you more grip under acceleration. Even the smallest change in your cars settings can make a Big difference. Our simple to follow instruction chart will show how to attain the best Set-up for your personal requirements.

  With simple to follow language, we can point you towards the correct Electric Motor for your SP3 Matiz and achieve the best Gearing, for your battery and motor combination.

  Learn the secrets the professionals have known for years to get the best from their Bearings using a number of simple tips. See how you can easily avert Radio interference, and the best way to safely Charge your Batteries, for improved acceleration and more run time.









Gas/Nitro Engines Body Shells Radio Transmitters etc Tires Wheels/Rims Electronic Speed Controllers Battery Packs / Chargers Electric Motors












Items For Sale:






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★ Academy SP3 Matiz Chassis ★
Academy SP3 Matiz Chassis

★ Academy SP3 Matiz Chassis ★
Academy SP3 Matiz Chassis


General Information and Advice

   For those starting in Radio Controlled Racing, here are a few Hints and Tips: Firstly, buy a Kit not an RTR. That way, if something breaks you will have some idea how to fix it.

   Radio Controlled Model Cars are very fragile and easily broken. The main parts to protect are the Front Wishbones, Suspension Shock Towers, Dampers, Hub Carriers, Kingpins, Uprights and Toe in Blocks, so make sure you have a good strong front bumper and Lexan or Hard Plastic Body Shell and if available for your model, a protective under tray, to prevent grit and dust getting into any moving parts.

   The Steering Servo is also a weakness in high speed crash situations, so get yourself some good strong Servo Mount and Servo Saver. Also I would recommend Titanium Shafts, Turnbuckles, Tie Rods and pivot/steering shafts and if available for your model, lightweight Titanium Drive shafts, dog bones and CVD (Constant Velocity Drives). The standard steel types are far too easily bent.

   Gearing is another problem area on RC model cars. Head on collisions can easily break off gear teeth on Nylon/Plastic Spur Gears and even Bevel Gears inside the Gearbox. Heavy impacts can also loosen nuts and self taping screws that hold the Motor in Position, allowing the Pinion Gear to pull out of mesh slightly and rip the tops of the teeth on your Spur Gear. To avoid this to some degree, fit locking nuts and a new motor mount from time to time, so the self taping screws that hold the motor in position have less chance to come loose.

   Ball joints always cause problems. For top level Radio Controlled model car racing, the plastic ball connectors should be checked and if deemed necessary changed after every meeting. A simple thing like a loose fitting connector breaking free could easily end your race, so better safe than sorry.

   Many New car kits come with Nylon and Sintered Brass Ring type bearings. My advice is to discard these before initial installation and buy a good Hop-up set of Shielded Steel Ball Bearings. Or if you are serious about your racing, Teflon or Ceramic Bearings.

   One final piece of advice about the Setup of your Car. Keep the Centre of Gravity as low as possible. Ride Height is all important. For On Road Drift/Touring cars the Ride Height should be no more than 5mm, for Buggys, Trucks, Truggys and Monster Trucks, as low as possible depending on the track conditions. If Body Roll is a problem, handling can be improved with the use of Stabilizers, Anti roll or Sway Bars, stiffer Tuning Springs and, or thicker Silicon Oil in the Dampers. Also find somewhere to mount the Transponder as low in the Chassis as possible.

For Car Setup Information check out our Hints and Tips page.

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Manufacturers and Brands Catalogued and Listed by RC-Scrapyard.


   At present, the RC Model Manufacturers, Brands and Distributors covered by us are: ABC Hobby, Academy, Acme Racing, Agama Racing, Amewi, Ansmann Racing, ARRMA, Team Associated, Atomic RC, Axial, AYK, Bolink, BSD Racing, Capricorn, Carisma, Carson, Caster Racing, Cen, Corally, Custom Works, Durango, Duratrax, ECX - Electrix, Exceed RC, FG Modellsport, FS-Racing, FTX, Fujimi, Gmade, GS-Racing, Harm, HBX, Helion, Heng Long, Himoto Racing, Hirobo, Hitari, Hobao, Hong-Nor, Hot Bodies, HPI, HSP, Intech, Integy, Jamara, JQ Products, Kawada, Kyosho, Losi, LRP, Maisto, Mardave, Marui, Maverick, MCD Racing, Megatech, Mugen, New Bright, Nichimo, Nikko, Nkok, Ofna, Pro-Pulse, Protech, PTI, RC4WD, Redcat Racing, RJ-Speed, Robitronic, Schumacher, Seben, Serpent, Smartech, Sportwerks, Step-Up, Tamiya, Team-C Racing, Team Magic, Thunder Tiger, Tomy, Top Racing, Traxxas, Trinity, Tyco, Vaterra RC, Venom, VRX Racing, WLToys, X-Factory, Xmods, Xpress, Xray, XTM, Yankee RC, Yokomo, ZD Racing and Zipzaps.

   This is an ongoing project, with new and "lost in time" RC Model Brands being added as they are found and although most of those listed above have been covered in relative detail, some are still being researched and will be completed in the near future.


















Hints and Tips

Gearing to Win

   Just because you have the latest model, the best available batteries, the most powerful electric motor or nitro engine, doesn't mean you will go out and win everything in sight. The fastest car on the track is rarely the one that wins, it's the one that can accelerate out of corners under control and remains consistent and efficient from the start to the end of a race.

   In days gone bye, all you had to consider was the number of mili amp hours (Mah) in your battery and the current draw of your high powered motor. Gearing for a five minute race was a balancing act. But with the development of the new high capacity batteries, brushless motors and smart ESC, all that changed. Now, gearing is more of a matter of what suits your driving style and how quick your reflexes are on the sticks, the trigger and steer wheel of your transmitter. So, where do you start?

   At your local club track, you quickly find the right combination and set-up for your car by talking to the more experienced members. After a while, as your knowledge grows, tweaking a few things here and there can give you that small edge to keep you competitive. So, it follows that on tracks you don't know, you should talk to the locals there, who may be racing a similar model to your own and adjust your set-up to suit.

   Gearing correctly for any given track is absolutely crucial if your car is to be competitive.

   Too high a gearing may get you in front at the start of a race, but as your motor begins to overheat and lose efficiency, that initial advantage will soon be lost.

   Too low a gearing and although it may get you past your opposition accelerating out of the corners, you will loose that place again on the fast straights. Gearing low will always get you to the end of the race, but it will hardly ever get you on the winner's rostrum.

   Having said that, on tracks you don't know, initially it's always best to err on the side of low gearing. For your first practice laps on a new track, choose a motor that has a reasonable current draw and with a fully charged battery, try a race length run, learn the corners what line to enter and exit, where you can accelerate to overtake and how fast you need to be on the straights to keep up (not overtake) the opposition. After your practice race, check the remaining capacity in your batteries and the temperature of your motor, (keep records of each motor and discover at what temperature a specific motor loses efficiency all this helps when selecting the right gearing.)

   Armed with this knowledge you can then consider how to alter your gearing.

   If the motor is cool (in comparison) and your battery has ample remaining charge, try a larger pinion perhaps one or two teeth more. Don't overdo it.

   An overly hot motor and low remaining capacity battery speaks for itself. The race timed practice run should have given you an insight to this problem. Obviously, in this instance you must use a smaller, less teeth pinion, or start again with a milder, less powerful motor.

   If the motor is hot, but not too hot, the battery has ample remaining charge and you did not notice any drop in efficiency towards the end of your practice run, then you are close to the optimum set up for that particular motor.

   Depending on how competitive that set-up is, you can stick with it, maybe tweak a tooth up or down, or repeat the process with a different motor to get you where you want to be.

For More Setup Information check out my Hints and Tips page.







Hints and Tips

On Road Indoor Carpet Tires


   Some indoor carpet tracks do not allow you to use anything but foam tires. The reason being the wear on the carpet some soft rubber tires, such as Proline Hawgs and Schumacher pin-spikes can create. But on some tracks, where a combination of carpet and wooden board is used, rubber tires may be allowed.

Sponge or Foam Tires


   Basically there are three foam compounds available: Soft, Medium and Hard.
   Soft foam tires will normally provide the best grip on most carpeted tracks, but wear faster than other compound tires. They also wear unevenly. Cornering always puts more stress on the outside wheels, so naturally they will wear more. Therefore, in an effort to even out that wear, the wheels must be swapped over from side to side after each race and re-trued before the next race meeting.

   Incidentally, if you are looking to learn or hone your drifting skills, try a set of hard compound foam tires. They may not be the best tires to win races on a carpet track, but the fun level is brilliant.

Foam Tire Additive


   Most indoor carpet tracks allow some kinds of tire additive, but not all. One guy at our local track, used to dip his foam tires in a glass of light ale.

   Although this form of additive may seem a little odd, there are a high number of weird and wonderful concoctions used by racers in the RC world and just as many available commercially, most of which will improve grip if that is what you want.

Rubber Tires for Indoor Tracks


   Unlike outdoor racing where track temperature comes into play, indoor tire choice is comparatively easy.

   On tracks where rubber tires are allowed, with a combination of carpet, board or other surface type, the choice of tire is generally determined by the areas of track where the grip is least. Local knowledge on these tracks is always helpful as a starting point, but don't always accept any suggestions as being the best. Trial and error, on your practice laps, before racing begins in earnest, can often highlight a different tire more suited to your particular driving style.

   Also check out my article for On-Road Tarmac Tires.

For More Setup Information check out my Hints and Tips page.










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