RCScrapyard ► Tamiya The Fox. ITEM: #58051 - For Sale in The USA.

Tamiya Buggys RCScrapyard: New, used, second hand radio controlled models, parts and spares.
Established 1999
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Tamiya The Fox - #58051

1/10 Scale Electric RC Buggy:

  Released in October 1985, the 2WD Tamiya Fox was one of the most successful buggies of its time. The design of this buggy is similar to the "Hotshot" and was a very attractive model sporting golden wheels.
  To build, the car was a little awkward and even worse to maintain. After the Fox a regular model builder would find assembling other models quite easy.
  The sealed gearbox mechanism was always a problem. This was meant to protect against moisture but to simply change the crystals or adjust the speed controller involved having to dismantle the buggy into 2 halves and it turned out the box wasn't as waterproof as it should have been.
  The Fox handling was heavy with a lot of understeer. This was remedied with the addition of the front stabilising bar, which really should have been part of the original kit. Once fitted this gave much improved handling and steering. The cars acceleration and speed was not a problem.
  Collectors all agree The Fox is one of the Tamiya Classic Buggies and will long remain much sought after.
      Rating: 3.53.5 Stars out of 5 Reviewed by: RCScrapyard     Manual.


★ Tamiya The Fox ★
Tamiya Fox - #58051













USA

Tamiya #58051: For Sale in the USA

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Tamiya The Fox Chassis
Tamiya The Fox Chassis
Tamiya The Fox
Tamiya The Fox

General Information and Advice

   For those starting in Radio Controlled Racing, here are a few Hints and Tips: Firstly, buy a Kit not an RTR. That way, if something breaks you will have some idea how to fix it.

   Radio Controlled Model Cars are very fragile and easily broken. The main parts to protect are the Front Wishbones, Suspension Shock Towers, Dampers, Hub Carriers, Kingpins, Uprights and Toe in Blocks, so make sure you have a good strong front bumper and Lexan or Fiberglas Body Shell, and if available for your model, a protective under tray, to prevent grit and dust getting into any moving parts.

   The Steering Servo is also a weakness in high speed crash situations, so get yourself some good strong Servo Mount and Servo Saver. Also I would recommend Titanium Shafts, Turnbuckles, Tie Rods and pivot/steering shafts and if available for your model, lightweight Titanium Drive shafts, dog bones and CVD (Constant Velocity Drives). The standard steel types are far too easily bent.

   Gearing is another problem area on RC model cars. Head on collisions can easily break off gear teeth on Nylon/Plastic Spur Gears, and even Bevel Gears inside the Gearbox. Heavy impacts can also loosen nuts and self taping screws that hold the Motor in Position, allowing the Pinion Gear to pull out of mesh slightly and rip the tops of the teeth on your Spur Gear. To avoid this to some degree, fit locking nuts, and a new motor mount from time to time, so the self taping screws that hold the motor in position have less chance to come loose.

   Ball joints always cause problems. For top level Radio Controlled model car racing, the plastic ball connectors should be checked and if deemed necessary changed after every meeting. A simple thing like a loose fitting connector becoming loose could easily end your race, so better safe than sorry.

   Many New car kits come with Nylon and Sintered Brass Ring type bearings. My advice is to discard these before initial installation, and buy a good Hop-up set of Shielded Steel Ball Bearings. Or if you are serious about your racing, Teflon or Ceramic Bearings.

   One final piece of advice about the Setup of your Car. Keep the Centre of Gravity as low as possible. Ride Height is all important. For On Road Drift/Touring cars the Ride Height should be no more than 5mm, for Buggys, Trucks, Truggys and Monster Trucks, as low as possible depending on the track conditions. If Body Roll is a problem, handling can be improved with the use of Stabilizers, Anti roll or Sway Bars, stiffer Tuning Springs and, or thicker Silicon Oil in the Dampers. Also find somewhere to mount the Transponder as low in the Chassis as possible.

For Car Setup Information check out our Hints and Tips page.

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★ Tamiya Radio Controlled Model Accessories: ★
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Hints and Tips

Radio Gear

How to avoid Interference.


1/  The first consideration when installing your Receiver into your Electrically Powered Model is to make sure it is well away from the Negative Battery terminal, and the Motor. The Magnetic field can cause stuttering type interference at times of high current draw (i.e., Fast Acceleration)

2/  Make sure the Ariel tube is long enough for the Ariel wire. The tip of this wire is highly sensitive and should be as high, and as far away from the Motor as possible (yup, its that magnetic field prob again)

3/  If all else fails, a simple tip that often works for all RC Model enthusiasts is to wrap the receiver in Aluminium Foil, to shield against any magnetic and external radio interference.

4/  As a last resort, to protect against servo twitch, try ferrite beads. (available at Radio Shack or Maplins) These are threaded over the red, white (or yellow) and black wires of each servo.

5/  If you are using a FET Servo, the installation of a choke (a small electrical component) in the positive feed wire will smooth out any current spikes and reduce the possibility of "servo twitch".

6/  Another thing you might try is a "glitch buster" or "stutter stopper". Basically, this is a capacitor that simply plugs into your Radio Receiver and attempts to keep a level voltage supply to the Radio system.

For More Setup Information check out my Hints and Tips page.





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