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Tamiya Semi Pole Trailer - # 56310 (Radio Controlled Model Review)

1/14 Scale Semi-Trailer -

  Released by Tamiya on July 8, 1999, the Semi Pole Trailer kit (#56310) is made to go with the Tamiya series of 1/14 scale R/C Tractor Trucks. An Online Limited Sales version, Factory Finished, Limited Edition RTR Pole Trailer (#23669) was introduced in 2009.

Tamiya Semi Pole Trailer - # 56310
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  The trailer model is based on a rigid alloy ladder frame chassis, with alloy panels, solid axle, leaf-spring suspension, friction dampers, 4 highly detailed wheels and 5 plastic pipes are included.

  The kit comes with Plastic and Sintered metal bush type bearings, that after a short while, when dust and grit get into them, can actually wear into the metal drive shafts that spin in them. If you are building this kit to run seriously these should be replaced by a full set of steel shielded ball bearings.


      Rating: 45 Stars out of 5 Reviewed by: RCScrapyard     Manual.

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Tamiya Semi Pole Trailer - Chassis
Tamiya Semi Pole Trailer Chassis

Tamiya Semi Pole Trailer
Tamiya Semi Pole Trailer

Tamiya Semi Pole Trailer
Tamiya Semi Pole Trailer


General Information and Advice

   For those starting in Radio Controlled Racing, here are a few Hints and Tips: Firstly, buy a Kit not an RTR. That way, if something breaks you will have some idea how to fix it.

   Radio Controlled Model Cars are very fragile and easily broken. The main parts to protect are the Front Wishbones, Suspension Shock Towers, Dampers, Hub Carriers, Kingpins, Uprights and Toe in Blocks, so make sure you have a good strong front bumper and Lexan or Hard Plastic Body Shell and if available for your model, a protective under tray, to prevent grit and dust getting into any moving parts.

   The Steering Servo is also a weakness in high speed crash situations, so get yourself some good strong Servo Mount and Servo Saver. Also I would recommend Titanium Shafts, Turnbuckles, Tie Rods and pivot/steering shafts and if available for your model, lightweight Titanium Drive shafts, dog bones and CVD (Constant Velocity Drives). The standard steel types are far too easily bent.

   Gearing is another problem area on RC model cars. Head on collisions can easily break off gear teeth on Nylon/Plastic Spur Gears and even Bevel Gears inside the Gearbox. Heavy impacts can also loosen nuts and self taping screws that hold the Motor in Position, allowing the Pinion Gear to pull out of mesh slightly and rip the tops of the teeth on your Spur Gear. To avoid this to some degree, fit locking nuts and a new motor mount from time to time, so the self taping screws that hold the motor in position have less chance to come loose.

   Ball joints always cause problems. For top level Radio Controlled model car racing, the plastic ball connectors should be checked and if deemed necessary changed after every meeting. A simple thing like a loose fitting connector breaking free could easily end your race, so better safe than sorry.

   Many New car kits come with Nylon and Sintered Brass Ring type bearings. My advice is to discard these before initial installation and buy a good Hop-up set of Shielded Steel Ball Bearings. Or if you are serious about your racing, Teflon or Ceramic Bearings.

   One final piece of advice about the Setup of your Car. Keep the Centre of Gravity as low as possible. Ride Height is all important. For On Road Drift/Touring cars the Ride Height should be no more than 5mm, for Buggys, Trucks, Truggys and Monster Trucks, as low as possible depending on the track conditions. If Body Roll is a problem, handling can be improved with the use of Stabilizers, Anti roll or Sway Bars, stiffer Tuning Springs and, or thicker Silicon Oil in the Dampers. Also find somewhere to mount the Transponder as low in the Chassis as possible.

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Or, check out our RC Model Car Setup Guide













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Hints and Tips

Emergency Plastic Part Repairs

   It always happens when you least expect it. You are racing hard; and suddenly some idiot decides to side swipe you' and break your front wishbone. Even though you may carry spare parts for just about everything on your car, it always seems to be the same part that breaks and although you made a mental note the last time it happened to get a replacement you soon realise those mental notes were not worth the paper they are written on.

   So there you are, in the middle of nowhere with no spares. You ask around and no one has anything like your car, least of all parts for it and the closest model shop is 100 miles away. What are you supposed to do now?

   Some kind of repair is your only option.

   The one thing quite a few people think of first is superglue, but that kind of repair won't even get you around the first corner.

   What you need is something much stronger and the only way you can do that requires a good quality soldering iron, the plastic sprue (the bit left over when you remove all the parts for your car) or another broken part made from the same plastic.

   Using the largest tip you have, set the temperature so that it melts the plastic, but does not vaporise it. Place your broken part on a flat surface that will not be affected by the heat from the iron. I use the glass plate I have for setting the wheel camber of my model. Next, cut a piece of scrap plastic long enough for you to be able to hold on one end, as you work with it and place it over the break. At the point directly over the break, carefully melt the scrap plastic until it is around one millimetre above the break.

   Gently slide the iron sideways, depositing the scrap plastic about five millimetres either side and around the break. At each end of the fix, try to meld the scrap and broken part plastic. Picking up the broken part, continue the melding around each side of the break, then place it down the flat surface and repeat the process on the other side.

   When satisfied, switch off the iron and allow the plastic to cool. Using a modelling knife, carefully, cut away any excess plastic, but not too much.

   With a little practice a fix like this can be almost as strong as a new part and can save you a whole lot of anguish.

For More Setup Information check out my Hints and Tips page.







Hints and Tips

Shock Mount Settings

   The combinations of Shock settings available on the majority of on and off road cars are far too many for this article to cover, so I will endeavour to explain some of the basics, that should give you some idea what these changes might achieve. Some of the settings suggested may not be available on all RC model cars.

   If you look at the lower wishbones of you model, you may see a number of holes alongside where the ball studs for the dampers are positioned. If you were to remove those studs on the rear wishbone and reposition them in the hole further out from the center of the car, the first thing you will notice is the ride height has dropped, this can be corrected by adding C spacers above the springs. The second thing you will notice is the shocks are more sluggish, this can be compensated by using thinner oil. If this adjustment is made on an off-road car, it can be advantageous for landing after big jumps, providing improved stability due to the increased hydraulic pack in the shocks (as described in my previous article). This setting can also improve the way cars handle small bumps and dips in the track, due to the softer static damping.

   Changing the mounting hole positions used by the dampers, on the wishbone or on the shock tower, will always change the angle the dampers lay. This angle is what changes the characteristics of the shocks in that they will react to different track types and conditions. The above example is just food for thought, for those looking to improve their cars handling in relation to any other settings, such as caster, camber, toe-in etc, they may have previously made on their car. The only way to really get to grips with this subject is through trial and error.

For More Setup Information check out my Hints and Tips page.








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