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Tamiya Semi Reefer Trailer - # 56319 (Radio Controlled Model Review)

1/14 Scale Semi-Trailer -

  Released by Tamiya on March 26, 2008, the Semi Reefer (Refrigerated) Trailer Kit, European style with 3-axles (#56319) is made to go with the Tamiya series of 1/14 scale R/C Tractor Trucks. An Online Limited Sales version, Factory Finished, Limited Edition RTR reefer Trailer (#23655) was introduced in 2008.

Tamiya Semi Reefer Trailer - # 56319
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  The trailer model is based on a rigid alloy ladder frame chassis, with alloy panels, solid axle, leaf-spring suspension and friction dampers.

  The kit comes with Plastic and Sintered metal bush type bearings, that after a short while, when dust and grit get into them, can actually wear into the metal drive shafts that spin in them. If you are building this kit to run seriously these should be replaced by a full set of steel shielded ball bearings.


      Rating: 45 Stars out of 5 Reviewed by: RCScrapyard     Manual.

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Tamiya Semi Reefer Trailer - Chassis
Tamiya Semi Reefer Trailer Chassis

Tamiya Semi Reefer Trailer
Tamiya Semi Reefer Trailer

Tamiya Semi Reefer Trailer
Tamiya Semi Reefer Trailer


General Information and Advice

   For those starting in Radio Controlled Racing, here are a few Hints and Tips: Firstly, buy a Kit not an RTR. That way, if something breaks you will have some idea how to fix it.

   Radio Controlled Model Cars are very fragile and easily broken. The main parts to protect are the Front Wishbones, Suspension Shock Towers, Dampers, Hub Carriers, Kingpins, Uprights and Toe in Blocks, so make sure you have a good strong front bumper and Lexan or Hard Plastic Body Shell and if available for your model, a protective under tray, to prevent grit and dust getting into any moving parts.

   The Steering Servo is also a weakness in high speed crash situations, so get yourself some good strong Servo Mount and Servo Saver. Also I would recommend Titanium Shafts, Turnbuckles, Tie Rods and pivot/steering shafts and if available for your model, lightweight Titanium Drive shafts, dog bones and CVD (Constant Velocity Drives). The standard steel types are far too easily bent.

   Gearing is another problem area on RC model cars. Head on collisions can easily break off gear teeth on Nylon/Plastic Spur Gears and even Bevel Gears inside the Gearbox. Heavy impacts can also loosen nuts and self taping screws that hold the Motor in Position, allowing the Pinion Gear to pull out of mesh slightly and rip the tops of the teeth on your Spur Gear. To avoid this to some degree, fit locking nuts and a new motor mount from time to time, so the self taping screws that hold the motor in position have less chance to come loose.

   Ball joints always cause problems. For top level Radio Controlled model car racing, the plastic ball connectors should be checked and if deemed necessary changed after every meeting. A simple thing like a loose fitting connector breaking free could easily end your race, so better safe than sorry.

   Many New car kits come with Nylon and Sintered Brass Ring type bearings. My advice is to discard these before initial installation and buy a good Hop-up set of Shielded Steel Ball Bearings. Or if you are serious about your racing, Teflon or Ceramic Bearings.

   One final piece of advice about the Setup of your Car. Keep the Centre of Gravity as low as possible. Ride Height is all important. For On Road Drift/Touring cars the Ride Height should be no more than 5mm, for Buggys, Trucks, Truggys and Monster Trucks, as low as possible depending on the track conditions. If Body Roll is a problem, handling can be improved with the use of Stabilizers, Anti roll or Sway Bars, stiffer Tuning Springs and, or thicker Silicon Oil in the Dampers. Also find somewhere to mount the Transponder as low in the Chassis as possible.

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Or, check out our RC Model Car Setup Guide













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Hints and Tips


Electric Motors for RC Models

Brushless Motor Basics

   Choosing the right Brushless motor for your needs can be a daunting task for those new to Radio Controlled Models. If you have a local club perhaps you could ask some of the more experienced members for their advice, but a little basic knowledge about the subject, so you know what questions to ask is always useful.

   All Brushless motors are rated by Kilovolts (KV) and is an indication of the revs per minute (RPM) that particular Motor can attain running freely, under no load conditions, per Volt of input.

   For Example: To calculate the Maximum RPM of a Motor listed at 4000 KV, connected to a 7.4 Volt Battery, simply multiply the two: 4000 x 7.4 = 29600 RPM.

   The two main types of Brushless Motors used in RC are Sensored and a Sensorless Motors.
   Sensored Motors can be connected directly using s cable, to the Electronic Speed Controller (ESC). The ESC is then able to monitor the performance of the Motor and regulate Current output, to attain smooth, controlled acceleration. Advance and Retard timing is made automatically by the ERSC to change torque when exiting corners and give you more RPM for long straights.

   Sensorless Motors can only be set manually for Advance and Retard timing and once that setting is made you have to stick with it. For obvious reasons, Sensorless motors are cheaper to buy than the Sensored type: Ideal if you just want to bash around in the back yard, but not so much if you are serious about your racing.

   Brushless Motors, need a reasonable amount of maintenance if they are to remain competitive. For top level racing I recommend you strip, clean and re-oil the bearings every 2 or 3 meetings (Check out our "get the best from your bearings" section).
   Gearing your motor correctly for any given track is always important. (Check out my Gearing tips on the Pinions Section of this site) A cool motor is an efficient motor. As your motor heats up towards the end of a race, it will loose efficiency. Gearing correctly can avoid this problem to some degree and simply following my simple guidelines, described in the aforementioned article can help you not only keep your motor running efficiently, but help you stay in front of your opposition.

   One last tip .. When re-building your Brushless Motor, to safely replace the Rotor, use a rolled up piece of paper and place it into the Can. This will protect your rotor against damage. Then carefully remove the paper before replacing the endbell.

For More Setup Information check out my Hints and Tips page.







Hints and Tips

Wheel Balance

   The day I passed my driving test at the young age of 17, the first thing I did was to drive over to my girlfriends house and take her out to a long straight stretch of road close by, where the boy racers would often congregate. No one was around that day, so the road was relatively quiet. I slowly went through the gears and we were soon up to 65 with no problems, but as we got closer to 70, my hands began to sense a small vibration on the steering wheel. By the time we hit 75, the steering wheel and the whole car was vibrating wildly. My girlfriend was hysterical, screaming for me to "slow down!" I did of course and tried to calm her down.

   Back home I told my dad what had happened. He then reminded me that just the week before we had put on a new set of front tires and suggested the wheels were probably out of balance. Sure enough, after the wheels were re-balanced, at 85, 90, the car was steady as a rock and drove perfectly.

   As I got deeper into RC, that memory returned and I realised to be more competitive I would have to balance all my wheels.

How I Balanced my Model Car Wheels


   Wheel balancing equipment for RC cars is now available on line and from most RC model shops, but back then I had to make my own using the rear end of an old Tamiya F1 car.

   With the insert fitted and the tire mounted and glued, the wheel was then bolted onto my home made balancer and while holding the balancer tightly, I spun the wheel vigorously. Invariably it would vibrate to some degree. To balance the wheel, I would next allow it to settle, then turn the wheel through 90 degrees and again allow it to settle. Obviously the heavy side of the wheel would drop to the bottom due to gravity. Once satisfied I made a mark on the rim with a felt tip pen at the top of the wheel where it came to rest. Removing the wheel, a small amount of plastic resin was then pressed into a recess on the inside of the wheel, on the side where I made the mark. The whole process was then repeated until I was totally satisfied. The final vigorous spin was always virtually vibration free.

   I was amazed just how out of balance some of those wheels were and how much a small thing like that can make a difference on the track.

For More Setup Information check out my Hints and Tips page.








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