RCScrapyard ► Turnigy Batteries for RC Models: For Sale in The USA, UK, Australia, Canada, Spain and Ireland (Eire)

Battery Accessories RCScrapyard: New, used, second hand radio controlled models, parts and spares.
Established 1999
Batteries for RC Models
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RC Battery Chargers:
Charger Types:

AC Chargers
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Radio Equipment:
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RC Model Types:
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Turnigy Batteries

For Radio (Remote) Controlled Models
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★ Hints and Tips ★
  Find out all the pros and cons of your Turnigy Battery and discover the best way to charge it to provide more punch, duration and increased performance. Also, if you need to discharge your Batteries to increase its effective life.
  Learn the best position to mount your Turnigy Battery in relation to your Electric Motor and Radio Receiver to avoid Radio interference and Servo Twitch.

★★ Batteries by Type and Voltage: ★★
Ni-Cd:
Ni-Cd Batteries
Ni-Mh:
Ni-Mh Batteries
Li-Po:
Li-Po Batteries
Li-Fe:
Li-Fe Batteries
1.2v Ni-Cd
4.8v Ni-Cd
6v Ni-Cd
7.2v Ni-Cd
8.4v Ni-Cd
9.6v Ni-Cd
1.2v Ni-Mh
4.8v Ni-Mh
6v Ni-Mh
7.2v Ni-Mh
8.4 Ni-Mh
9.6v Ni-Mh
10.8v Ni-Mh
12v Ni-Mh
3.7v Li-Po
7.4v Li-Po
11.1v Li-Po
14.8v Li-Po
18.5v Li-Po
22.2v Li-Po
25.9v Li-Po
29.6v Li-Po
33.3v Li-Po
37v Li-Po
3.3v Li-Fe
6.6v Li-Fe
9.9v Li-Fe

★★ Battery Accessories: ★★
Battery-Analyzer
Battery Analyzers
Battery-Jig
Battery Jigs
Battery-Straps
Velcro Straps
Voltage Testers
Voltage Testers
Battery-Wire
Battery Wire
Gas/Dischargers
Dischargers
Fireproof-Bag
Fireproof Bags
Glow-Starter-Batteries
Starter Batteries
Heatshrink
Heatshrink
Radio Batteries
Radio Batteries
Battery Connectors
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Heatsinks
Heatsinks

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RC Model Batteries:
Accessories:

Battery Analyzers
Battery Chargers
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Battery Dischargers
Battery Heatshrink
Battery Heatsinks
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Battery Straps
Battery Wire
Fireproof Battery Bags
Voltage Indicators

Radio Batteries:
Receiver Batteries
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By Model:
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Battery Types:
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AAA Batteries
Ni-Cad Batteries
Ni-Mh Batteries
Li-Po Batteries
Li-Fe Batteries

Pack Types:
Glow Starter Batteries
Hardcase Batteries
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Saddle Pack Batteries
Stick Pack Batteries


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★ Radio Controlled Model Accessories: ★
Gas/Nitro Engines
Nitro Engines
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Bearings
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Tires
Wheels/Rims - Touring, Buggy, Truck, Monster Truck, Rock Crawler
Wheels
Electronic Speed Controllers
ESC
Battery Packs
Batteries + Chargers
Electric Motors
Electric Motors

Hints and Tips


How to Charge Rechargable Batteries for Radio Controlled Models

Ni-Cad (Nickel Cadmium) Batteries


1/  All Ni-Cad Batteries have to be Discharged soon after use. This is to avoid the dreaded "Memory" effect that on subsequent re-charges can cause a momentary drop in performance during a race. A simple discharger can be made from a car 12v bulb.

2/  Try to time your charge to complete just before a race. This will ensure maximum punch and duration. If a Ni-Cad is left to cool after a charge this advantage dissipates.

3/  The higher the charge current the more Punch the Ni-Cad battery will have (up to around 8 amps), however, the downside to this is a reduction in duration and effective battery life.

4/  Ni-Cad Batteries should be left to cool for about an hour after use before recharging. This will increase the effective life of the battery.


Ni-Mh (Nickel Metal Hydride) Batteries


1/  Never charge Ni-Mh batteries at a current higher than 4.5 amps. Although these batteries can give a higher voltage than Ni-Cad Batteries, they are much more sensitive and easy to damage if charged too quickly.

2/  Charging methods for Ni-Mh batteries can also be detrimental. The best I found was the "Slope" method. Avoid "Pulse" charging as this tends to effect crystal formation detrimentally and (it seems to kill them off) thus reduces duration over time.

3/  If using a temperature cut off charger on Ni-Mh batteries set to no more than 40 Degrees Centigrade. Any higher than this can damage the crystals.

4/  It is not necessary to discharge Ni-Mh Batteries. Unlike Ni-Cad batteries they do not develop a memory. Also, if they are totally discharged they sometimes will not charge straight after and need to be coaxed with a 10 minute trickle charge.

5/  Ni Mh Batteries can be recharged shortly after use without any discernable detrimental effects.


Li-Po (Lithium-Polymer) Batteries


1/  Li-Po batteries are a huge step forward in performance compared with Ni-Cad and Ni-Mh batteries. However, care has to be taken when charging. If certain procedures are not followed they could burst into flames or even explode, therefore I do not recommend Li-Po batteries for RC beginners.

2/  Li-Po batteries are more expensive and have a shorter effective life. Generally considered to be between 200 to 400 charge cycles compared to 1000+ for Ni-Cad and Ni-Mh.

3/  Consider a Battery pack listed as "2S 5000Mah 40c 2C".
"2S" is the number of cells in the pack, in this case 2 cells. Each cell provides around 3.7 Volts, so a 2S pack is around 7.4 Volts.
"5000Mah" (Mili-Amp-Hours) is the capacity. The amount of charge the pack can hold.
"40c" is the maximum Discharge rate. Which in our example would be calculated as 5000 (Mah) x 40 = 200000Ma (200 Amps).
"2C" is the maximum Charge rate. 1C being 5 Amps, so in our example 2 x 5 = 10 Amps.

4/  To safely charge your Li-Po Battery I would recommend a good Computerised charger, preferably one that can handle a Charge current of around 25A and always place the charging battery on a fireproof surface.

5/  Finally. NEVER leave your charging Li-Po battery unattended and NEVER EVER charge it above the recommended rate. When not in use, store with around 60% charge remaining in a fireproof box.


For More Setup Information check out my Hints and Tips page.




Hints and Tips

Radio Gear

How to avoid Interference.


1/  The first consideration when installing your Receiver into your Electrically Powered Model is to make sure it is well away from the Negative Battery terminal, and the Motor. The Magnetic field can cause stuttering type interference at times of high current draw (i.e., Fast Acceleration)

2/  Make sure the Ariel tube is long enough for the Ariel wire. The tip of this wire is highly sensitive and should be as high, and as far away from the Motor as possible (yup, its that magnetic field prob again)

3/  If all else fails, a simple tip that often works for all RC Model enthusiasts is to wrap the receiver in Aluminium Foil, to shield against any magnetic and external radio interference.

4/  As a last resort, to protect against servo twitch, try ferrite beads. (available at Radio Shack or Maplins) These are threaded over the red, white (or yellow) and black wires of each servo.

5/  If you are using a FET Servo, the installation of a choke (a small electrical component) in the positive feed wire will smooth out any current spikes and reduce the possibility of "servo twitch".

6/  Another thing you might try is a "glitch buster" or "stutter stopper". Basically, this is a capacitor that simply plugs into your Radio Receiver and attempts to keep a level voltage supply to the Radio system.

For More Setup Information check out my Hints and Tips page.




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RC Models:

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Radio Equipment:

Accessories:
Buggys
Formula One
Monster Trucks
Rock Crawlers
Touring/WRC/Drift Cars
Trucks/Truggys


Airplanes
Boats/Ships
Helicopters
Motorcycles
Submarines
Tanks


Crystal Sets
Receivers
Servos
Transmitters


Batteries
Battery Chargers
Bearings
Body Shells
Dampers (Shocks)
Electric Motors


ESC
Nitro Engines
Pinion Gears
Spur Gears
Tires
Wheels