RCScrapyard ► Tamiya Willy's Wheeler. ITEM: #58039 - For Sale in The USA.

Tamiya Buggys RCScrapyard: New, used, second hand radio controlled models, parts and spares.
Established 1999
Tamiya Monster Buggy
Site Search
Complete RC Model Listings    USA - Sitemap UK - Sitemap AU - Sitemap CA - Sitemap ES - Mapa del sitio IE - Sitemap DE - Sitemap FR - Plan du Site IT - Mappa del sito NL - Sitemap AT - Sitemap CH - Sitemap    From Around The WORLD

Tamiya Willy's Wheeler - #58039

1/10 Scale Electric Stunt Car:

  Released in August 1983, Willy's Wheeler (Honda City Turbo Racing) was Tamiya's second stunt model after the successful Wild Willy, Willy's M38 (#58035).
  Using the same "Wild Willy" chassis but with smaller wheels and tires, plus slightly higher gearing, Tamiya based this model on the Honda City Turbo Racers used at the Suzuka GP for a ladies demonstration race.
  Much like its predecessor, Willy's Wheeler was a wheelie fun drive. The RS-540S motor being more than enough power for the car to perform its stunts.
  For the collector, Willy's Wheeler models can be hard to find, but good quality examples do from time to time become available.
      Rating: 44 Stars out of 5 Reviewed by: RCScrapyard     Manual.


★ Tamiya Willy's Wheeler ★
Tamiya Willys Wheeler, Honda City Turbo Racing, Stunt Car - #58039













USA

Tamiya #58039: For Sale in the USA

Logo


USA - Sitemap UK - Sitemap AU - Sitemap CA - Sitemap ES - Mapa del sitio IE - Sitemap DE - Sitemap FR - Plan du Site IT - Mappa del sito NL - Sitemap AT - Sitemap CH - Sitemap


Tamiya Willy's Wheeler #58039 - Chassis
Tamiya Willy's Wheeler #58039 Chassis
Tamiya Willy's Wheeler #58039 - Body Shell
Tamiya Willy's Wheeler #58039 Body Shell

My First National

   When I first started in RC, way back in the late 1980s, I would turn up to the weekly club meeting, with my Tamiya Boomerang, transmitter, two sets of crystals, a couple of batteries, a charger and a tool box with a wheel spanner and a few spares.
   It was three five minute qualifying rounds and a final, and every month we would have a trophy meeting. The trophies were donated by a two of the older semi professional guys who basically ran the club and over the years had collected what must have been hundreds of trophies and had no space for them anymore. The lure of a trophy always brought out the "not as enthusiastic types" and the small church function room was always packed on those nights.
   About a year in, my collection of B final trophies was beginning to clutter my room, and my dad bought me the new Tamiya Manta Ray. That was the big turning point in my RC career.
   From then on it was A finals all the way. Then one day in the summer of 1992 the club organisers (the semi pro guys) asked me if I would like to go to a BIG national meeting way down south in Malvern. I asked my dad and with a bit of prompting he said "why not".
   When we got to that meeting we found there were around a hundred competitors, with ten groups of ten. I was in group "H". and two of my friends who came down with us were in group "I" so were on just before me.
   I remember that first race like it was yesterday. It was a staggered start and I set off next to last. I had never raced on a proper outdoor dirt track before. My only experience was on indoor carpet, but my old Manta Ray took off like a bullet. Most of the others in my heat were rookies, and by the end of the third lap I was up with the leader. He was good very good but I stuck to him like glue. Each twist, turn and jump brought me closer and closer, this guy was fast, but I was faster for a while anyway. A lap before the end my old over worked 1400mah battery, was struggling to give me what I needed to keep up with him and my buggy got slower and slower. I ended up third in that first race, but wasn't about to give up that easy.
   There was a shop at the meeting and straight after the race I nagged my dad to get me a new battery. In those days money was tight, and normally before dad would spend anything he would consult my mum, but this time she wasn't there, and after watching my performance in that race he didn't need much pushing to get me that badly needed new battery.
   Waiting for the second round seemed to take an age, but when it arrived I was pumped up and ready with steely determination. I was away third after finishing third in the first round, so my duel with the guy who beat me before carried on where it had left off. Two laps in and I was on his tail. He wasn't going to beat me this time. We lapped a couple of back markers and were quickly catching up to a third. He slipped past him in a flash, but when I moved in, the idiot drove straight into me, knocking my Manta Ray on its back. The marshal was oblivious to my plight. I shouted my head of but the marshals eyes were fixed on what I guess was the car of one of his friends in my race. The next thing I saw was my dad, bounding across the track like a gazelle, picking up my car, putting it on the track and giving me the thumbs up. I drove like the wind, passing car after car, slowly working back up to third, where I eventually finished.
   But it didn't end there. Because my dad had ran out onto the track, I was disqualified we pleaded our case and eventually were allowed to continue.
   The third round heat arrived. This time I wasn't going to let anything stop me. My focus was to win that race, and beat that guy who had all the luck so far. Because of the previous race I set off last. Car after car was left in my wake, until once more it was me against him. Mano a mano, he saw it was me and he upped his game. Lap after lap we duelled for the lead. Coming into the very last lap I was a nose in front and pulling away. With each corner I could sense the battery was once again giving up and my car started to slow down. Corner after corner I could see him getting closer and closer. we got to the final straight and he was right on top of me breathing down my neck. I held my breath and jammed over the throttle leaver and just crossed the line before him I had won my first national heat race. and it wasn't to be the last.

For Car Setup Information check out our Hints and Tips page.

^ TOP ^


    ★ RC Information and Advice ★    





Click Here

Not Here?
Maybe Tomorrow.
♥ Add This Page to your Favorites (Ctrl+D) ♥

★ Tamiya Radio Controlled Model Accessories: ★
540 Electric Motors
Tamiya Motors
Battery Packs
Batteries + Chargers
Bearings and Bearing Sets
Tamiya Bearings
Body Shells
Tamiya Shells
Electronic Speed Controllers
Tamiya ESC
Radio Equipment
Tamiy Radio
Dampers
Tamiya Shocks
Tires
Tamiya Tires
Wheels / Rims
Tamiya Wheels


★ Tamiya Willy's Wheeler ★
Tamiya Willys Wheeler -


Hints and Tips


Rechargeable Batteries
for RC Models


   At the time this article was written, there are four types of Rechargeable Batteries that are commonly in use of Radio Controlled Models.
Ni-Cad (Nickel Cadmium) Batteries have been around the longest. My first stick battery, purchased way back in 1987 was rated at 1200Mah (Mili Amp Hours) and with a silver can 27 Turn motor my Tamiya Boomerang would run around in the back yard for a good seven minutes before slowly coming to a stop. Ni-Cad development continued until around 1998 to a maximum rating of around 2000Mah and matchers pack builders and battery technicians were able to put together six cell packs with voltages approaching 7.4 Volts, to give those that could afford them, an edge over the rest.

   Ni-Mh (Nickel Metal Hydride) Batteries came along in the late 1990s, and by the year 2000 were available at ratings up to 3000Mah. Again, matchers and pack builders worked hard to provide the ardent racer with packs to provide that little bit of extra power, and ESC manufacturers also chipped in with improved controllers to take full advantage of this new technology.
   Now the problem wasn't gearing the car to get to the end of the race using the available battery power, but to find the brushed motor that could handle gear setting that provided the speed and acceleration without the motor overheating and wearing the commutator too much so it needed a skim after every 2 runs. My favourite at that time was the 9 Double.

   More recently, Li-Po (Lithium-Polymer) Batteries have appeared on the scene, providing are a huge step forward in performance when compared with Ni-Cad and Ni-Mh batteries. However, Li-Po Batteries are much more expensive than previous battery types, have a shorter effective life of between 200 and 400 charge cycles, compared to well over 1000 charge cycles for Ni-Cad and Ni-Mh, and a high degree of care has to be taken when charging Li-Po batteries. They have been known to burst into flames or even explode, for this reason I do not recommend Li-Po batteries for RC beginners.
   Another problem with Li-Po packs is they are physically bigger in size, so for those with older "Vintage" models, they may not fit into the provided space for the battery on the chassis.

   The latest development in battery technology for RC are Li-Ion. Originally produced for Laptops, Ipods, Tablets and the like, they are now available for RC models. Much like Li-Po for price and charge cycle life, the power and capacity is a moderate improvement, but for me, at the moment, not worth the expense.

   One final word of warning. NEVER leave your charging Li-Po or Li-Ion battery unattended when being charged, and NEVER above the recommended charge rate. After use, store each battery with about 60% charge remaining, and always in a fireproof bag.


For More Setup Information check out my Hints and Tips page.


Trend Times Toy Store


On/Off Road
RC Models:

Other RC Models:

Radio Equipment:

Accessories:
Buggys

Formula One

Monster Trucks

Rock Crawlers

Touring/WRC/Drift Cars

Trucks/Truggys



Airplanes

Boats/Ships

Helicopters

Motorcycles

Submarines

Tanks



Crystal Sets

Receivers

Servos

Transmitters



Batteries

Battery Chargers

Bearings

Body Shells

Dampers (Shocks)

Electric Motors



ESC

Nitro Engines

Pinion Gears

Spur Gears

Tires

Wheels