RCScrapyard ► Iconic Vintage Radio Controlled (RC) Model Car Archive ► Tamiya Rover Mini Cooper Racing M03. ITEM #58211/#92177/#57045 M-03.
Tamiya Buggys RCScrapyard: New, used, second hand radio controlled models, parts and spares.
Established 1999
Tamiya Monster Buggy
Search Site Search
Radio Controlled Models    Flags    From Around The WORLD

Tamiya Rover Mini Cooper Racing - #58211

1/10 Scale Electric M-Chassis Model Car - M-03 Chassis:

  Released by Tamiya in 1998, this self assembly Radio Controlled model, based on the M03 chassis, is of the Rover Mini Cooper Racing car. The lexan polycarbonate body shell accurately recreates the lines of this classic British car.
  This was the first Tamiya model to use the M03. The construction of this chassis has three variations. There is the basic M03 short wheelbase, the M03M medium wheelbase and the M03L long wheelbase.
  Like its predecessor the M01, the M03 is a front wheel drive, front mounted motor design, with bevel gear differential and four coil spring over friction shock absorbers, instead of the two mono shocks of the M01.
  To get the best from this car you need to make a couple of alterations. First, replace the plastic bush type bearings with a set of Ball bearings. This should be done when you build the car. If you run the car with the plastic ones installed, dust and grit get into them that damage the drive shafts. Secondly, replace the friction dampers with oil filled ones. This vastly improves the cars handling.
  To drive, the M03 is a definite improvement over the M01. However, because of its high centre of gravity, it still takes some practice to keep the car on four wheels when cornering great fun though.
      Rating: 44 Stars out of 5 Reviewed by: RCScrapyard     Manual.





★ Tamiya Rover Mini Cooper Racing - M03 ★
Tamiya Rover Mini Cooper Racing - #58211 M-03












             TAMIYA MODEL LISTS             
A to Z or By Number
Tamiya Buggys
★ Buggys ★
Tamiya Trucks
★ Trucks ★
Tamiya Off Road
★ Monster Trucks ★
Tamiya Off Road Chassis Types
★ Off Road Chassis ★
Tamiya Touring Car
★ Touring/Drift ★
Tamiya WRC Car
★ WRC ★
Tamiya M Chassis
★ M Chassis ★
Tamiya On Road Chassis Types
★ On Road Chassis ★
Tamiya F1
★ Formula One ★
Tamiya Le Mans
★ Le Mans ★
Tamiya F1/Le Mans Chassis Types
★ F1/LM Chassis ★
Tamiya Military
★ Military ★


USA

Tamiya # 58211: For Sale in the USA






Flags


Tamiya Rover Mini Cooper Racing #58211 M-03 - Chassis
Tamiya Rover Mini Cooper Racing #58211 M-03 Chassis
Tamiya Rover Mini Cooper Racing #58211 M-03 - Body Shell
Tamiya Rover Mini Cooper Racing #58211 M-03 Body Shell

Hints and Tips

Keeping Notes

   If all you will ever do is go racing at your local track every week, then this article is not for you. However, if you ever look towards travelling around to different tracks around the country, or even the world, the value of keeping notes is all too obvious.

   Every time I raced in a regional or national competition meeting, I would make detailed notes, aided by a little local knowledge initially, and later fine tuned to suit my own driving style.

   My experience now means there are few, if any outdoor tarmac tracks within a 300 mile radius I haven been to, and my notes on motor, gearing, camber angles, shock settings, tire choice and what inserts work best for that particular track, amongst others, allow me to save valuable time on the finer points of car setup, that can be done in the warmth of my own home on the kitchen table days before the meeting, instead of the often crippling heat, or the arduous conditions inside a wind blown tent.

   There are lots of methods for making notes on setup. The easiest perhaps is to download the blank pages often supplied by your cars manufacturer with a line drawing of your car and spaces for you to fill in as to the setting you prefer. Great if each time you go to a particular track the conditions are always constant. Notes made on a cold windy day will be little use on a hot sunny days racing on the same track.

   Manufacturers setup pages for their top drivers can also be useful as a starting point, but you should never take that setup as being the best there could ever be.

   So, the first note you should make is of the weather conditions. The wind and its direction isn't really what I am talking about, although it can have an effect on your cars handling, it is not something you can change your setup to handle. Track temperature and humidity are the main things to note. Not the average for the day, but for each round of racing. And note what tires you used, and how the car handled in each race. Detail everything that might be useful in the future, no matter how trivial.

   Note the motor used, and the gearing. Check the temperature of the motor after the race, how much charge is left in the batteries. You may have won the race, but there is always room for improvement your competitors will be doing just that.

   Every bit of information you compile will be useful for the next time you visit that particular venue. Weather forecasts these days are far more accurate than they used to be, so the adage "fore warned is fore armed" fits the bill. Simply search through your notes and find a day you raced with similar conditions to those forecast, and set up your car to suit. But don't stop there.

   The conditions may be the same as they were when you made your notes, but that doesn't mean you can't improve your setup. Your practice laps will soon prove if your previous setup was correct, or give you a basis for more fine tuning.

   If you want to be the best, you have to work at it. Success doesn't come easy. You can be the best driver around, but if your setup isn't perfect you will never step up onto the winners rostrum. My motto if you never try anything, you never do anything. And if you never do anything wrong, you aren't trying hard enough.

For More Setup Information check out my Hints and Tips page.



^ TOP ^


    ★ RC Information and Advice ★    







Click Here

♥ Add This Page to your Favorites (Ctrl+D) ♥

★ Tamiya Radio Controlled Model Accessories: ★
540 Electric Motors
Tamiya Motors
Battery Packs
Bats + Chargers
Bearings and Bearing Sets
Tamiya Bearings
Body Shells
Tamiya Shells
Electronic Speed Controllers
Tamiya ESC
Radio Equipment
Tamiy Radio
Dampers
Tamiya Shocks
Tires
Tamiya Tires
Wheels / Rims
Tamiya Wheels


Tamiya Rover-Mini-Cooper-Racing-M03


Hints and Tips


Bearings

   If you are serious about your racing, looking after your bearings is essential if you are to remain competitive.
   My own experience is in both Off and On Road, National and International Car racing, but most of these tips could be useful to all forms of RC.

   Shields: The main problem with Ball Bearing Shields is they create friction, and obviously the more you can reduce friction, the more efficient your bearings will be, so here's a tip that does just that.
   Wheel Bearings always come in pairs, positioned side by side. If you think about it, the two inside shields on each bearing are not required, so ... you can remove them using a small jewelers screwdriver ... simple. And in one fell swoop you have halved your wheel bearing friction.

   Cleaning: All Bearings need to be cleaned from time to time. Depending on how focused and competitive you are, this can be as often as after each race meeting, or just once or twice a year ... For Club Meetings once or twice a year might be all you need if you are easily beating your competition, but for the BIG meets you need that extra 5% or 10% just to be up with the rest.
What you need is a small glass jar, a jewelers screwdriver, an old tooth brush and some Isopropanol.
Remove the shields, then drop the bearings in the jar, add some Isopropanol, pop on the lid and shake well. Empty them out, give them a good brushing and make sure they spin free then repeat the process. Clean the shields separately. Once you are satisfied, lay them on a piece of kitchen roll and allow to dry.

   Lubrication: The arguments I have had about what lubrication to use you wouldn't believe. Some of the top racers of my day swore they didn't use any at all, but cleaned out the original lubrication and ran them dry ... they also admitted to fitting a new set after each meeting ... well, they were getting them for free.
My tip is, yes even with a new set of bearings, clean out the original lubrication (as described above) and with one shield in place use the thinnest oil you can find ... I recommend ZX1 (Zed Ex One) or sewing machine oil.

For More Setup Information check out my Hints and Tips page.



On/Off Road
RC Models:

Other RC Models:

Radio Equipment:

Accessories:
Buggys

Formula One

Monster Trucks

Rock Crawlers

Touring/WRC/Drift Cars

Trucks/Truggys



Airplanes

Boats/Ships

Helicopters

Motorcycles

Submarines

Tanks



Crystal Sets

Receivers

Servos

Transmitters



Batteries

Battery Chargers

Bearings

Body Shells

Dampers (Shocks)

Electric Motors



ESC

Nitro Engines

Pinion Gears

Spur Gears

Tires

Wheels