RCScrapyard ► Tamiya Rough Rider. ITEM: #58015 - For Sale in The USA.

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Tamiya Rough Rider - #58015

1/10 Scale Electric Buggy:

  The Rough Rider was Tamiya's first Racing Buggy which immediately attracted a much larger audience to RC racing. This car was based on the popular sand racing or dune buggys.
  Mostly made from metal parts, with the exception of the hard plastic body and fibreglass plate chassis, the model very heavy but hard wearing and incorporated a water resistant radio box. Trailing arms with Hairpin springs and oil filled dampers provided adequate suspension.
  Beginners in RC racing loved this car as it could take a pounding and still not break. Admittedly, with its rear stock tires and stiff torsion bars, the Rough Rider didn't have the best traction, but it was fun to drive and raced on rough terrain with ease.
  Parts for this early model are still available, but are expensive. Many Tamiya collectors have the Rough Rider proudly in their collection.
      Rating: 44 Stars out of 5 Reviewed by: RCScrapyard     Manual.


★ Tamiya Rough Rider ★
Tamiya Rough Rider - #58015













USA

Tamiya #58015: For Sale in the USA

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Tamiya Rough Rider #58015 - Chassis
Tamiya Rough Rider #58015 Chassis
Tamiya Rough Rider #58015 - Body Shell
Tamiya Rough Rider #58015 Body Shell

Hints and Tips

Battery Connectors

   Over the years I have been racing radio controlled model cars of all descriptions, I have tried a number of different connectors for my batteries.

   My first car was a Tamiya Boomerang, and of course the batteries I used all had the standard Tamiya connectors, which were fine with the kit supplied 27T silver can electric motor, but I soon discovered their problem when I installed my first Modified motor. The high current demands of the motor created so much heat, the plastic surround of the connectors melted and fused together. No matter how I tried they could not be disconnected. My only option was to cut the wires.

   From there I moved over to Corally connectors, commonly referred to by many now as Bullet connectors. Comprising of a short length of 4mm gold plated tube at one end, and what looks like what we used to call a Chinese lantern fitting that slotted inside the tube, also gold plated. Although they were highly efficient and reasonably easy to install and use, I never really took to this type of connector, I think it was the fact each connector was exposed, leaving the possibility of a short circuit.

   Then I remember buying some second hand batteries at an area meeting one day, they had these little red block connectors I soon learned were "Deans" rated at around 40 Amps. The looked like just what I was looking for so I gave them a try. They worked fine, although I didn't like the shortness of the part to be soldered. However, for about two years they were my connector of choice, until I stumbled across an advert in the "Radio Race Car International" magazine.

   The latest development of connectors at that time were named "Power Pole" and rated at 45 Amps. A small tube, plated with silver, with a short extending lip, that slotted over the exposed wire. This could either be crimped onto the wire or soldered. For safety and efficiency, I preferred the latter. Then to complete the connector, a colour coded plastic cover fitted neatly over it. The connector is still the most efficient I have come across, and never overheats. That was way back in 1995 and I am still using them to this day. So, if you are looking for a connector to solve your overheating problems "Power Pole" is the one I recommend.

For More Setup Information check out my Hints and Tips page.



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Hints and Tips


Rechargeable Batteries
for RC Models


   At the time this article was written, there are four types of Rechargeable Batteries that are commonly in use of Radio Controlled Models.
Ni-Cad (Nickel Cadmium) Batteries have been around the longest. My first stick battery, purchased way back in 1987 was rated at 1200Mah (Mili Amp Hours) and with a silver can 27 Turn motor my Tamiya Boomerang would run around in the back yard for a good seven minutes before slowly coming to a stop. Ni-Cad development continued until around 1998 to a maximum rating of around 2000Mah and matchers pack builders and battery technicians were able to put together six cell packs with voltages approaching 7.4 Volts, to give those that could afford them, an edge over the rest.

   Ni-Mh (Nickel Metal Hydride) Batteries came along in the late 1990s, and by the year 2000 were available at ratings up to 3000Mah. Again, matchers and pack builders worked hard to provide the ardent racer with packs to provide that little bit of extra power, and ESC manufacturers also chipped in with improved controllers to take full advantage of this new technology.
   Now the problem wasn't gearing the car to get to the end of the race using the available battery power, but to find the brushed motor that could handle gear setting that provided the speed and acceleration without the motor overheating and wearing the commutator too much so it needed a skim after every 2 runs. My favourite at that time was the 9 Double.

   More recently, Li-Po (Lithium-Polymer) Batteries have appeared on the scene, providing are a huge step forward in performance when compared with Ni-Cad and Ni-Mh batteries. However, Li-Po Batteries are much more expensive than previous battery types, have a shorter effective life of between 200 and 400 charge cycles, compared to well over 1000 charge cycles for Ni-Cad and Ni-Mh, and a high degree of care has to be taken when charging Li-Po batteries. They have been known to burst into flames or even explode, for this reason I do not recommend Li-Po batteries for RC beginners.
   Another problem with Li-Po packs is they are physically bigger in size, so for those with older "Vintage" models, they may not fit into the provided space for the battery on the chassis.

   The latest development in battery technology for RC are Li-Ion. Originally produced for Laptops, Ipods, Tablets and the like, they are now available for RC models. Much like Li-Po for price and charge cycle life, the power and capacity is a moderate improvement, but for me, at the moment, not worth the expense.

   One final word of warning. NEVER leave your charging Li-Po or Li-Ion battery unattended when being charged, and NEVER above the recommended charge rate. After use, store each battery with about 60% charge remaining, and always in a fireproof bag.


For More Setup Information check out my Hints and Tips page.


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