RCScrapyard ► Radio Controlled (RC) Models, Parts and Spares ► MCD Cheetah MT V4. 1/5 Scale Desert Truck For Sale in The USA.

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1/5 Scale Nitro Truck/Truggy:

MCD Cheetah MT V4


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How To Set-up, Hints and Tips for the MCD Cheetah MT V4:

  If you need to get more from your MCD Cheetah MT V4, it has to have the best settings for your driving style, and provide you with excellent handling and stability. The smallest changes can make a huge difference in the way your car performs on the track, and our comprehensive instructions will help you to find the best Set-up to get you where you want to be.
  If you are having any problems, our guide will show you what to look for and how to fine tune the Nitro Engine for your Cheetah MT V4.
  With some basic, sensible tips, you will discover just how easy it is to avert Radio interference, and Servo trouble, by moving your receiver or adjusting the position or height of your antenna. See how you can halve the friction and maintain your MCD Cheetah MT V4 Bearings with a few common sense hints and tips.


★ MCD Cheetah MT V4 ★
MCD Cheetah MT V4






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MCD Cheetah MT V4: For Sale in the USA

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★ MCD Cheetah MT V4: ★


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Buying a Used MCD Cheetah MT V4 Truck.


   Buying a used MCD Cheetah MT V4 Nitro Truck, or any used RC Model, has a number of advantages. It is generally cheaper than new, ready built and may come with a variety of expensive hop-ups already installed. Cheap, pre-loved bargains are always becoming available. However, depending on the age of your purchase, it may need a little tender loving care before you can take it out on the back yard.

   The one thing you will always need is an instruction manual. If not supplied with your purchase they can often be downloaded from the MCD website, or purchased separately on eBay. With an instruction manual, any problems with your model Truck you may discover can easily be fixed.

   When you receive your used MCD Truck, make a general visual inspection of the chassis, front and rear wishbones, suspension shock towers etc, for anything broken that may need to be replaced. Then, take a screwdriver and box spanner and check each self tapping screw and nut for security, taking care not to over tighten. Next, for those MCD models with oil filled shock absorbers, remove them from the chassis and dismantle the coil springs. The damper shafts should push in and pull out with a smooth action. If you feel a jolt as you change direction, this means the oil has leaked out and must be topped up. At the same time, change the O-Ring seals to prevent more leakage. Also check the damper shafts for damage. If they are scratched, change them as soon as possible.

   If the body shell of your MCD Cheetah MT V4 is broken, ripped or damaged in any way, this can be easily repaired with rubber solution glue. Also, for added protection and if available for your Cheetah MT V4 model, fit an under guard to stop dirt and gravel entering the chassis.

   Examine the drive shafts for wear and replace as required. If possible, change them for titanium. The steel shafts wear and bend too easily.

   If you intend to race your Cheetah MT V4 Truck model at a competitive level, I would also recommend you obtain and fit titanium pivot shafts, turnbuckles, tie rods and steering rods.

   The gearbox of your used Truck should be opened up to check for gear wear and lubrication. A thin coat of grease is often used on internal gears and although this is fine for basic running around on the back yard, if you intend to race your Truck at a higher level, this should be removed and replaced with racing oil (ZX1 or Teflon Oil). Of course, this should be reapplied after each race meeting.

   Gears are a weakness on all Truck RC models. Head on collisions can easily damage the gear teeth on nylon and plastic spur gears. Heavy impacts can also loosen the nuts or self tapping screws that hold the Nitro Engine in Position, allowing the pinion gear to pull out of mesh slightly and rip the tops off the teeth on your spur gear. To minimise this possibility, fit bolts with locking nuts to the Nitro Engine mount and remember to check them for security after every two or three runs.

   Ball joints always cause problems. For top level Nitro Truck racing, the plastic ball connectors should be checked and if deemed necessary changed after every meeting. A simple thing like a loose fitting connector popping off could easily end your race, so better safe than sorry.

   The Cheetah MT V4 steering servo is also prone to damage. In high speed crash situations, the fragile gear teeth of the servo can be broken off, rendering your expensive servo useless, so be sure to obtain a good quality "Servo Saver". Check out my Servo Information article.

   If body roll on your MCD Cheetah MT V4 is a problem, handling can be improved with the use of stabilizers, anti roll or sway bars, stiffer tuning springs and, or, thicker silicone oil in the dampers.

   If your used MCD Truck comes with plastic and sintered brass ring type bearings, check the shafts that run in them for wear. Dust and grit can get into these bearings and abrade the shafts. Therefore, you should replace them all with shielded ball bearings. If the model has been run with ring type bearings, you may have to change all the axles and driveshafts. For more information, take a look at my article, How to get the best from your Bearings.

   Finally, good luck with your Cheetah MT V4 model and good racing.


For More on how to Setup your Truck, check out my Hints and Tips page.


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Hints and Tips

Gearing to Win

   Just because you have the latest model, the best available batteries, the most powerful electric motor or nitro engine, doesn't mean you will go out and win everything in sight. The fastest car on the track is rarely the one that wins, it's the one that can accelerate out of corners under control, and remains consistent and efficient from the start to the end of a race.

   In days gone bye, all you had to consider was the number of mili amp hours (Mah) in your battery, and the current draw of your high powered motor. Gearing for a five minute race was a balancing act. But with the development of the new high capacity batteries, brushless motors and smart ESC, all that changed. Now, gearing is more of a matter of what suits your driving style and how quick your reflexes are on the sticks, the trigger and steer wheel of your transmitter. So, where do you start?

   At your local club track, you quickly find the right combination and set-up for your car by talking to the more experienced members. After a while, as your knowledge grows, tweaking a few things here and there can give you that small edge to keep you competitive. So, it follows that on tracks you don't know, you should talk to the locals there, who may be racing a similar model to your own, and adjust your set-up to suit.

   Gearing correctly for any given track is absolutely crucial if your car is to be competitive.

   Too high a gearing may get you in front at the start of a race, but as your motor begins to overheat and lose efficiency, that initial advantage will soon be lost.

   Too low a gearing, and although it may get you past your opposition accelerating out of the corners, you will loose that place again on the fast straights. Gearing low will always get you to the end of the race, but it will hardly ever get you on the winner's rostrum.

   Having said that, on tracks you don't know, initially it's always best to err on the side of low gearing. For your first practice laps on a new track, choose a motor that has a reasonable current draw, and with a fully charged battery, try a race length run, learn the corners what line to enter and exit, where you can accelerate to overtake, and how fast you need to be on the straights to keep up (not overtake) the opposition. After your practice race, check the remaining capacity in your batteries and the temperature of your motor, (keep records of each motor and discover at what temperature a specific motor loses efficiency all this helps when selecting the right gearing.)

   Armed with this knowledge you can then consider how to alter your gearing.

   If the motor is cool (in comparison) and your battery has ample remaining charge, try a larger pinion perhaps one or two teeth more. Don't overdo it.

   An overly hot motor, and low remaining capacity battery speaks for itself. The race timed practice run should have given you an insight to this problem. Obviously, in this instance you must use a smaller, less teeth pinion, or start again with a milder, less powerful motor.

   If the motor is hot, but not too hot, the battery has ample remaining charge, and you did not notice any drop in efficiency towards the end of your practice run, then you are close to the optimum set up for that particular motor.

   Depending on how competitive that set-up is, you can stick with it, maybe tweak a tooth up or down, or repeat the process with a different motor to get you where you want to be.

For More Setup Information check out my Hints and Tips page.







Hints and Tips

Bumpsteer

   In plain language, Bumpsteer is exactly what it sounds like. If your car goes over a bump, it will affect the toe-in setting and can on some tracks make handling of the car in a straight line difficult.

   To check if your car might have any problems with bumpsteer, have it in race mode, with the motor and battery etc in position. Place the car on a flat surface and push down your car at the front. Looking down from above, keep a close eye on the wheels and watch for any angular movement to the side. If there is then you have bumpsteer.

   For off road cars, because of them having longer dampers in comparison to on road, a small amount of toe out is considered by many as acceptable in the lower position and can sometimes be used as a tuning option because of its aggressive effect on turning ability when entering corners. On road cars, because of the shorter damper movement and the greater need for precise steering and stability in a straight line, generally have less of a problem. However if bumpsteer is detected, drivers generally try to eliminate this as much as possible.

   The standard settings for most kits from all manufacturers are adjusted to reduce bumpsteer as much as they can and it is only when you come to make changes to those settings yourself, to suit your personal driving style that bumpsteer can become a problem.

   Any changes you might make to the steering links or the caster could induce some bumpsteer, so you should check for it each time you make any adjustments in these areas.

   To adjust bumpsteer try adding or removing washers under each steering link outer ball stud. More washers will increase and fewer washers reduce bumpsteer.

   Steering geometry can be tricky to setup for those new to the sport and even some more experienced racers can struggle with this problem. So, unless you are having major problems with your cars handling, try to avoid making any radical changes, and if you do, remember to only make one change at a time, and make a note of it for future reference, incase you need to remove it.

For More Setup Information check out my Hints and Tips page.








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